Authors

 

Achim Maas

Achim Maas is working as project manager at Adelphi Research. His main areas of work are the interlinkages and between natural resources, violent conflict and peace on all levels of society. Within these areas, the security implications of climate change as well developing analytical frameworks and methods are core topics. Currently, he works primarily on environmental cooperation in the South Caucasus within the context of the Initiative for Peacebuilding and the UN Environment Programme Expert Group on Environment, Conflict and Peacebuilding. Beyond that, he is a member of the Environment, Conflict and Cooperation Newsletter editorial staff. He studied political science, sociology, history and economics at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main. Subsequently, he concluded his studies with a Master in International Politics and Security Studies at the University of Bradford.

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Achim Wennmann

Achim Wennmann is a Researcher at the Centre on Conflict, Development and Peacebuilding (CCDP) and the Small Arms Survey of the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. He is involved in research projects on the economic dimensions of peace processes as well as armed violence prevention and reduction. His research interests involve the political economy of conflict and armed groups, state fragility, peacemaking, war-to-peace transitions, and the dynamics of armed conflict and violence. Dr. Wennmann is author of The Political Economy of Peacemaking (London: Routledge, forthcoming 2011), and co-editor (with Mats Berdal) of Ending Wars, Consolidating Peace (London: International Institute of Strategic Studies and Routledge, forthcoming 2010). Other publications with a link to natural resources include "Economic Provisions in Peace Agreements and Sustainable Peacebuilding" in N̩gociations, and "The Political Economy of Conflict Financing: A Comprehensive Approach Beyond Natural Resources" in Global Governance.

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Adam Pain

Adam Pain has combined a career of working in theory and practice in Rural Development. A lecturer in Natural Resources in Development Studies, University of East Anglia UK from 1976—1987, he worked in natural resource management in Africa & Asia, working in Sri Lanka 1979—81. In 1987 to 1991 he led a SADDC regional research programme based in Botswana. From 1992 to 2000 he worked as principle advisor to the Minister of Agriculture in Bhutan on research and extension policy and natural resource management. In 2001 he rejoined Development Studies, UK as a Senior Research Fellow and since then has worked extensively in Afghanistan on rural economy and change and with research programmes on Natural Resource management (forestry) in Nepal and India. Since January 2006 he has held the position of Visiting Professor in Rural Development at SLU, Uppsala, combining postgraduate teaching, support to a Vietnam Masters in Rural Development programme and continuing to work on the opium economy, rural change and policy making practices in Afghanistan. He is the co-principle investigator of an ESRC UK funded research programme on livelihood trajectories in Afghanistan. He has published extensively on Bhutan and Afghanistan.

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Adrienne Stork

Adrienne Stork works on the interface between conflict and natural resources, with a focus on post-conflict settings and sustainable development. She has been working on DDR and natural resource management for reintegration programs with UNDP/Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery since February 2009. She has a background in conservation and community development, including incentive-based conservation mechanisms through experience with the Environmental Defense Fund and the U.S. National Marine Protected Areas Center, and has field experience from various locations throughout Latin America. Originally from the United States, she holds a MA in International Environmental Policy from the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

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Aïda Tamer-Chammas

Aïda Tamer-Chammas is a PhD. candidate at SOAS, University of London, focusing her thesis on accountability for environmental damage arising out of armed conflict under international law. Her research interests cover international environmental law and humanitarian law. She graduated from Assas, University of Paris II, France, in 1986, with a Maîtrise degree in business law. After pursuing international law and economics studies at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, in Boston, Ms. Tamer-Chammas practised as a corporate and finance lawyer in Paris, from 1988 to 1995. She was part of a team advising the Government of Lebanon on the restructuring of the telecommunications sector, in a project financed by the World Bank. She further gained an LLM in international environmental law from SOAS in 1999.

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Akiva Fishman

Akiva Fishman is a Research Associate at the Environmental Law Institute. His work focuses on the link between natural resources and conflict, international environmental institutions, brownfields redevelopment, invasive species regulation, and adaptation of biodiversity conservation to climate change. His recent publications include: Institutionalizing Peacebuilding: The UNCC, Conflict Resources, and the Future of Natural Resources in Transitional Justice (in Environmental Liability: Gulf War Reparations and the UN Compensation Commission, Oxford University Press, 2011) (with Carl Bruch) and Legal Frameworks for Adaptive Natural Resource Management in a Changing Climate (Georgetown International Environmental Law Review, 2010) (with Daniel Schramm). Mr. Fishman holds a B.A. from Brandeis University in International and Global Studies: Global Environment.

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Akram Salam

Akram Salam is from Kabul, Afghanistan. He has 25 years of experience working with Afghan NGOs, international NGOs, and the United Nations as a community mobilizer, a construction engineer, and a coordinator and director of refugee camps in Pakistan and Afghanistan. The organizations which he has previously worked with include Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit, Architectes Sans Frontieres, UN-HABITAT, USAID, the University of Nebraska-Omaha, the Academy for Education Development, and the Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission. Mr. Salam currently directs an Afghan NGO called Cooperation for Reconstruction of Afghanistan. He has published a textbook under the title of Bar-reinforcement. Mr. Salam received a Bachelors degree in civil engineering from Kabul University and can speak Dari, Pashto, and Turkish.

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Alan Roe

Alan Roe holds the status of Adjunct Research Fellow at the School for Environmental Research, Charles Darwin University. Since completing his PhD investigating pastoral systems in Jordan, Dr. Roe has led research into diverse aspects of natural resources management and conservation, with a special focus on the Middle East, including as a post-doctoral Research Fellow with the University of Glasgow, and as Senior Research Manager for natural resources management with the Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit. In Afghanistan, he designed and led multi-disciplinary research projects on behalf of both the European Commission and the World Bank. Dr. Roe also works with natural resource management issues in Northern Australia, where he has been involved in planning, program development, and facilitation.

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Alex Dehgan

Dr. Alex Dehgan has worked on wildlife conservation and foreign policy in settings as diverse as Saddam Hussein's poolhouse in Iraq, in the western reaches of the Himalayans in post-conflict Afghanistan, the leech and predator-filled rainforests of southeastern Madagascar, Central & South America, the chaos of the collapsing halls of the Kremlin, former Soviet weapons labs in Central Asia, and the conservative and staid halls of the University of Chicago and the Field Museum of Natural History. In March, Dr. Dehgan was appointed as the Science and Technology Adviser to the Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development. Prior to coming to USAID, Dr. Dehgan worked as a Senior Scientist and Policy Adviser with the Science Adviser to the Secretary of State. Alex also recently served as a Senior Adviser to Amb. Dennis Ross, the Special Adviser for the Gulf and South West Asia, where he developed a science diplomacy engagement strategy with the Islamic Republic of Iran, advised on internal political dynamics, and served as the liaison to Amb. Holbrooke and the Office of the Special Representative to the President for Afghanistan and Pakistan. Dr. Dehgan's other posts at the Department of State include serving as a member of the Secretary of State's Policy Planning Staff, as an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Diplomacy Fellow in the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs (NEA), and as the Special Advisor to the Coalition Provisional Authority for Nonproliferation in Iraq. Working with other AAAS Fellows, he created the Iraqi Virtual Science Library, which made available thousands of journal titles to 100% of Iraqi students and scientists, as well as Iraq's technical ministries. Dr. Alex Dehgan previously served as the Afghanistan Country Director for the Wildlife Conservation Society's program in Afghanistan, which he founded. During his tenure there, WCS conducted the first comprehensive biological surveys of the country in 30 years in Nuristan, Herat, Wakhan, and Hazarajat Plateau, wrote many of Afghanistans biodiversity conservation legislation and policies, helped end illegal wildlife trade on US airbases, assisted in the development of Afghanistan's national park system, including the creation of Afghanistan's first national park at Band-e-Amir in Bamiyan Province. Dr. Dehgan holds a Ph.D and M.Sc. from The University of Chicago's Committee on Evolutionary Biology, a J.D. from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law, and B.S. in Zoology and Political Science from Duke University. He was chosen as an Icon of Science by Seed Magazine in 2005.

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Alexander Carius

Alexander Carius studied political science and law in Berlin and is co-founder and codirector of Adelphi Research and Adelphi Consult. He is specialised in international environmental policy and development cooperation. The main fields of his research and consulting include “Environment, Development, Foreign Policy and Conflict Prevention,” “Environmental Policy and Law in the ECCAA countries,” “Regional Environmental Cooperation” as well as governance and institutions in national and international environment policy. He is board member of various projects and scientific journals and member of the German Federal Foreign Office’s Advisory Board “Civilian Crisis Prevention”. In the past 15 years, he has served as a team leader for almost 100 projects in the area of environment, development and foreign policy, and published 125 research reports, articles and books.

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Alexandre Corriveau-Bourque

Alexandre Corriveau-Bourque is a Master's student at McGill University's Department of Geography. His thesis research examines the intersections between land tenure systems in post-war Liberia and the impact these interactions have on perceptions of security. Mr. Corriveau-Bourque has recently published some of his findings on post-war land tenure systems in Lofa County, Liberia with the Norwegian Refugee Council. His research interests include relations between the informal sector and the state, post-conflict natural resource management, legal pluralism, food security, and disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration.

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Ali Al-Lami

Ali Al-Lami currently serves as a Minister's Advisor in Iraq's Ministry of Environment. From 2005 to 2008 he was the National Coordinator for the Iraqi Marshlands Project at the United Nations Environment Programme. Dr. Al-Lami's previous academic experience includes being an Assistant Professor and Chief Researcher in aquatic ecology at Iraq's Fish Research Center. He has published more than 100 papers in both Arabic and English in the field of aquatic ecology in journals such as Marina Mesopotamica, the Journal of Environmental Science and Health, and the Journal for Pure and Applied Sciences. Dr. Al-Lami obtained a B.Sc. in aquatic ecology and a M.Sc. in algal ecology from Basrah University, Iraq. He earned his Ph.D. in freshwater ecology from Al-Mustansiriyah University, Iraq.

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Alison Lawlor Russell

Alison Lawlor Russell is a Project Director and Analyst at CNA, a non-profit think tank that provides analysis and solutions for national security leaders and public sector organizations. Ms. Lawlor Russell specializes in Middle East political-military affairs. She has traveled throughout the Middle East and worked with U.S. and regional military leaders. She has conducted several assessments of the social, political, economic, and security environment in the Middle East, with a particular focus on post-conflict environments and stability operations. Her recent Middle East-related work addresses the future development of the Iraqi Navy in the post-counterinsurgency environment. Ms. Lawlor Russell's naval strategy projects have included maritime security, global maritime strategies for partner capacity building, international support for global fleet stations, U.S. Navy - U.S. Coast Guard integration for theater security cooperation goals, and military partnerships with non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Ms. Lawlor Russell has lived in Syria, Morocco, and France. She holds a M.A. in International Affairs from American University and a B.A. in Political Science and French Literature from Boston College.

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Allan Cain

Allan Cain is an architect and specialist in project planning, urbanisation and the upgrading of squatter settlements. He has an undergraduate degree in Environmental Studies (Waterloo, Canada), did his graduate studies at the Architectural Association (London, UK) and further specialist studies at Harvard and Boulder, Colorado (in Microfinance). He has over 35 years of professional experience in developing countries, 28 of those in conflict and post-conflict Angola implementing projects for community water supply, school building & planning, environmental sanitation, land rights and public participation. Mr. Cain has also developed programmes with local civil society and NGO partners in Angola on peacebuilding. In recent years, he has participated in several programme evaluations and missions for the United Nations, European Union and the World Bank. He has worked in Canada, Egypt, Oman, Iran, USA, Niger, Angola and Mozambique. He is the director of Development Workshop (Canada, France and Angola), Canadian Honorary Consul to Angola and an Officer of the Order of Canada and a member of the boards of several development institutions. He has lectured at universities in Canada, Angola, Norway, USA, South Africa and UK. His articles and papers have been published widely in international journals. Along with his co-founders of Development Workshop he is working on a forthcoming book titled “Planning with Vulnerable People in Turbulent Times”.

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Amar Colakhodži

Amar Colakhodzic is an Environmental and Sustainability Manager in a Dubai based ESCO, responsible for 'greening' the real estate development market throughout the Gulf region. His professional career consists of various eco-friendly projects, including the development of a green project investment pipeline, setting up the regional sustainability information center for Southeast Europe – REIC (with the support of UNESCO-ROSTE), and acting as an independent environmental policy analyst and EIA evaluator in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Mr. Colakhodzic has an education background in Business and Project Management and a graduate degree in Environmental Sciences and Policy from Central European University; where he wrote his thesis on comparative assessment of the International Sava River Basin Commission, its capacity to prevent water-use conflicts and foster cooperation.

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Andrew Bone

Andrew Bone is Director of International Relations at De Beers. He started with De Beers as a diamond valuer and worked in many and various departments within the company's Rough Diamond Division, including overseas secondments in South Africa and Belgium. Later, he became an overseas buyer for six years, managing buying offices, mainly in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Following a year in the Sales Department, he joined Marketing Liaison and Corporate Communications where, following the emergence of the conflict diamonds issue, he headed a team that worked on developing stakeholder relations and contributing to the establishment of the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme. He went on to develop the concept of the Diamond Development Initiative with NGOs; Partnership Africa Canada and Global Witness. Today, Andrew is Director of International, Industry and Government Relations (International Relations). Based in London, International Relations is one of three component parts of De Beers Group External & Corporate Affairs, working in collaboration with Group Communications (Comms) and Corporate Responsibility (CR) in support of Country Managers in Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, India and Canada. The role of International Relations is to develop and maintain De Beers Group relationships with governments, intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), such as the United Nations and associated agencies, other international organizations, including some think tanks and academia, industry groups, and international, advocacy-focused, non-governmental organizations (NGOs). It deals with international policies, directives and norms that have an impact across the Group, such as the Kimberley Process and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Its mission is to promote and protect the business interests of De Beers through successful management of its relations with these stakeholder groups. Andrew Bone is also a director of the World Diamond Council and the Diamond Development Initiative, and is a visiting lecturer at the University of Westminster's Business School.

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Andrew Keili

Andrew Keili, a Mining Engineer by profession, is Managing Director of CEMMATS Group Ltd., a leading multidisciplinary engineering, environmental and project management consultancy in Sierra Leone. He has over 30 years of experience working in private industry, parastatals and in consulting practice. Mr. Keili has substantial experience in Sierra Leone's mining sector, having worked for two major mining companies in several capacities. He has done consultancy work for several international agencies and companies in Sierra Leone, USA and Ukraine. He has had considerable involvement in the formulation and review of government policies in the mining, environmental and infrastructure sectors and in sustainable development issues for Sierra Leone and has spearheaded work on several Environmental and Social Impact Assessment projects in the mining sector. Mr Keili is a member of several business and professional organisations in Sierra Leone and has written extensively on the Sierra Leone mining sector.

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Anita van Breda

Anita Van Breda is the Director of the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) Humanitarian Partnerships program based in Washington, D.C. She received an undergraduate degree in biology in 1988 from George Mason University, and a graduate degree from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Ms. van Breda began her career with WWF in 2002 working initially on marine conservation issues in Southeast Asia. In 2005 she developed a partnership with the American Red Cross to provide environmental guidance related to the Indian Ocean Tsunami Recovery Program and expanded the WWF green disaster response approach to the 2008 China earthquake and the 2010 earthquakes in Haiti and Chile. Ms. van Breda has held positions in environmental education in the Bahamas, natural resource management for the US National Park Service in the Virgin Islands, and marine conservation in Vanuatu and Papua New Guinea.

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Anke Hoeffler

Anke Hoeffler is a research officer at the Centre for the Study of African Economies and a research fellow at St. Antony's College, University of Oxford. Her research focuses on the macroeconomics of developing countries, the economics of conflict and political economy. She has published a range of articles on causes of war, military expenditure, post-conflict economies, the effect of aid and the problems of democracy in low-income and natural-resource-rich societies.

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Anne Hammill

Anne Hammill is a Senior Researcher for IISD’s Climate Change & Energy and Environment & Security programmes. Much of her work focuses on understanding how better environmental management can contribute to human security through resilience to climate stress, conflict prevention, and peacebuilding. Anne’s most recent work has involved field research, training, and policy analysis on climate change adaptation, as well as conflict-sensitive conservation in Eastern and Central Africa. She holds a BA in Geography & Environmental Studies, and a MA in Geography.

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Anne-Cécile Vialle

Anne-Cécile Vialle has worked for UNEP's Post-Conflict and Disaster Management Branch since 2006 in project management duties. Across this period she has been involved in various post-crisis (conflict or disaster) field assessments and recovery projects conducted by the Branch in Lebanon, Nigeria, the Dominican Republic, and Ukraine. Since 2009, as part of UNEP's "Environmental Cooperation for Peacebuilding" (ECP), Ms. Vialle has been coordinating the work of the Branch on legal protection and peacekeeping. In 2009, she co-authored the UNEP publication "Protecting the Environment during Armed Conflict: An Inventory and Analysis of International Law." Ms. Vialle is has a post-graduate degree in International Public and Criminal Law from the University of Leiden in The Netherlands. Her graduate and post-graduate research projects investigated subjects related to UN Peacekeeping and International Criminal Law.

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Annegret Mähler

Annegret Mähler is a political scientist and a research fellow at the GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies in Hamburg. Her current research is concentrated on the economic and political impact of natural resources with a special focus on violent conflict. She is working in the research-project "Is resource wealth a risk factor?" and is responsible for the case studies of Venezuela and Nigeria. At the same time she is doing her Ph.D. at the GIGA - Institute of Latin American Studies.

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Annette Lanjouw

Annette Lanjouw is a behavioural ecologist of great apes who has worked for the past 24 years on ape conservation. Her focus has primarily been on apes in Central Africa, starting with the Bonobo in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Eastern chimpanzee in the DRC, and the mountain gorilla, on the border of Rwanda, Uganda and the DRC. She now works for the Arcus Foundation, as the Director of the Great Apes Program. Annette Lanjouw is from the Netherlands and currently lives in Cambridge, United Kingdom.

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Annica Waleij

Annica Waleij is a senior analyst and project manager at the Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI). Her working field includes environmental information gathering in support of the Swedish Armed Forces (SwAF) intelligence and environmental protection assistance for Swedish Peace Support (PSO) and Crises Management Operations in e.g. Afghanistan, Africa and the Balkans. Furthermore, she works with designing and conducting environmental education and training for military and civilian deploying organizations. Current assignments also include environmental expert support to the United Nations Department of Field Support (UN DFS) and representing Sweden in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Science for Peace and Security Committee’ (SPSC). Waleij holds an MSc in Environmental Chemistry and a BSc in Environmental Health from Umeå University, Sweden.

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Arne Wiig

Dr. Arne Wiig, Chr. Michelsen Institute (CMI). Wiig is an economist with 20 years experience in research, consultancies and policy analysis. Wiig's thematic focus is on international trade and foreign direct investments, poverty analysis, resource economics and corporate social responsibility (CSR). His current research collaboration initiatives includes projects on 'Regional trade and poverty in SADC', and 'Entrepreneurship and human capital.' Wiig has published extensively on policies for beating the resource curse, CSR, barriers for exports of agricultural products and the impact of trade preferences for least developing countries. Wiig has undertaken long-term fieldwork in Bangladesh, Botswana, Namibia and Angola. Wiig is currently Research Director for the Poverty Reduction Group at CMI.

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Arthur Green

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Arthur Green is the chair of the Department of Geography and Earth & Environmental Science at Okanagan College in British Columbia, Canada. He is an educator, researcher, and consultant with experience in Central America, subSaharan Africa, and southeast Asia. He worked as a forestry extension agent for two years in Cameroon and has done extensive consulting for international organizations on agroforestry and natural resource management. His research interests include human-environment interaction, political ecology, food security, and access to property in post-conflict and post-disaster situations. His research on post-conflict property management was featured in an official event at the Rio+20 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development. Green holds a Ph.D. in geography from McGill University, where he was a McGill Major Fellow and a United States–Indonesia Society (USINDO) Sumitro Fellow.

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Arthur Green

Arthur Green is a McGill Major and USINDO Fellow currently working on his doctoral dissertation under Dr. Jon Unruh in the Department of Geography, McGill University. His research examines how land reforms in post-conflict and legally pluralistic contexts impact access to resources and subsequently the dynamics of resistance, conflict, and peace. His dissertation focuses specifically on conflict transformation and land reform in Aceh, Indonesia. His general research interests include land reform; legal pluralism; evolutionary economics; uneven spatial development; spatial statistics; and resistance, conflict, and peace studies. He combines his academic work with applied practice through consulting in Africa (Cameroon) and SE Asia and management of the non-profit organization Green Consensus.

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Asif Zaidi

Born in Quetta, Pakistan, Mr. Asif Zaidi has been the Operations Manager of UNEP’s Post-conflict and Disaster Management Branch since 2008. For more than four years prior to this, he was UNEP’s Afghanistan Programme Manager. He is qualified as a medical doctor, and holds a Master’s degree in Public Health from Leeds University, UK. He also studied at Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, USA, and Cranfield University School of Management, UK. His work in public health eventually led him to development work in which he has acquired over two decades of experience in international development and environmental management in Iran, Tajikistan, Pakistan and Afghanistan, while working for the Government of Iran, Aga Khan Development Network and IUCN - The World Conservation Union.

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Barbara McCallin

Barbara McCallin works as Housing, land and property Adviser at the Geneva-based Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre of the Norwegian Refugee Council. Current research focuses on addressing HLP issues in informal land tenure contexts. She contributed to the inter-agency Handbook on Housing and Property Restitution for Refugees and Displaced persons: Implementing the Pinheiro Principles. She is currently co-Chair of the Housing, land and property sub-group of the Global Protection Cluster Working Group. She recently co-authored a report : "Whose land is this? Land disputes and forced displacement in the western forest area of Côte d'Ivoire." Prior to joining IDMC, she worked for the UNHCR and the OSCE in Mali and Bosnia-Herzegovina where she played an active role in the implementation of the Property Legislation Implementation Plan. She graduated from the Institut d'Etudes Politiques d'Aix-en-Provence, and has a Master in international public law from the University of Aix-en-Provence.

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Belinda Bowling

South African-born Belinda Bowling is the Environmental Law and International Conventions Expert for the UNEP Capacity Building and Institutional Development Programme for Environmental Management in Afghanistan. She is based in Kabul, Afghanistan. She has a BA LLB LLM (Marine and Environmental Law) from the University of Cape Town, and has been working for the past ten years in the field of environmental law and policy in developing countries. Before joining UNEP in October 2003, Belinda worked as an environmental attorney and legislative and policy consultant, working with both the public and private sectors, primarily in the southern African region. Prior to specializing in environmental law, she worked as a commercial attorney.

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Benjamin Jones

Benjamin Jones is a graduate of Brown University and earned his JD degree at UC Berkeley Law in 2010. He served as a research assistant in the Law of the Sea Institute and in the Sho Sato Program in Japanese and US Law, at UC Berkeley Law School, during 2007-2010. He will join the firm of O'Melveny and Meyers as an associate in the fall of 2010.

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Bilha Joy Keiru

Bilha Joy Keiru is a development practitioner with over eight years of experience in the humanitarian and development field working with non-governmental organisations in Africa. She is currently working for Tearfund UK as a Policy and Learning Officer in a DFID-funded Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene programme in conflict and post-conflict zones in Africa, Asia and Haiti. Ms. Keiru has co-authored international conference papers titled "Innovative Rainwater Harvesting Techniques for Emergencies: Lessons from the Field" and "Strengthening Community Management of Water schemes in Post Conflict Context of Eastern DRC" for the 34th WEDC International Conference 2009, and World Water Week, Stockholm 2009, respectively. She holds a BA degree in Communications (Kenya) and an MA degree in Development Studies from the University of Leeds (UK).

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Binod Chapagain

Binod Chapagain has a Masters in Sociology and an MBA in Business Administration. He recently worked for Nepal Livelihoods and Forestry Programme, a bilateral program funded by UK Department for International Development. The program works directly with more than 4, 500 Community Forestry User Groups (CFUGs) including the areas mostly affected by conflict. He is directly involved in the strategizing and operationalizing programas the monitoring and communication adviser. Mr. Chapagain has conducted several studies and researches including economic impact of CFUG, forest-poverty link and impact of NGOs actions on rural poor. He has written papers and made presentations on climate change, livelihoods, economic impact of CFUGs and forest poverty issues among others. He has also published manuals on NGO capacity building, participatory monitoring and evaluation and a book titled ‘Healthier Civil Society’. Mr. Chapagain has been involved in issues like NGO capacity-building, poverty and exclusion, women’s rights and people’s rights over land and forest resources for more than 15 years in South Asia.

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Birgitta Liljedahl

Birgitta Liljedahl is a senior analyst at the Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) with specialty in environmental impact assessments and health hazard assessments in conflict and disaster areas. Since 2001, she has been the project manager for FOI support to Swedish Armed Forces (SwAF) regarding Environmental and Medical Intelligence, including environmental vulnerability assessments for Darfur, Chad, Lebanon, DRC and Afghanistan. Since 2006, she has been the project coordinator for the Collaboration on Environment and Health between Sweden and United Nations Department of Field Support (UNDFS) with pilot mission UNMIS, Sudan. Liljedahl has a background as an environmental geologist, and holds an MSc from Uppsala University, Sweden.

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Blake D. Ratner

Blake D. Ratner is an environmental sociologist, whose research focuses on natural resource governance, conflict, and cooperation from local to regional scales. He is Program Leader, Governance, at the WorldFish Center, a research-for-development center of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR). Blake leads a multidisciplinary team of researchers in Asia and Africa, aimed at catalyzing shifts in governance that enable social-ecological resilience. With the CGIAR system-wide program on Collective Action and Property Rights, he co-leads comparative research across natural resource systems exploring the role of property rights and collective action in conflict prevention. His articles on accountability, equity, and ethics in environmental decision-making have appeared in Society and Natural Resources, Human Rights Dialogue, Population Research and Policy Review, Human Organization, Sociological Inquiry, Marine Policy, and Global Change, Peace & Security. Blake is fluent in French, Spanish, and Khmer, and holds a Ph.D. in environmental sociology from Cornell University.

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Bocar Thiam

Bocar Thiam is a Social Scientist, specialized in Natural Resources Management in Sub-Saharan Africa. He has over fifteen years of professional experience in land tenure and property rights, public participation in natural resources planning and management, natural resources policy development, environmental and socioeconomic impact assessments, knowledge management and the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme in the alluvial diamond mining sector. He has worked on projects and programs funded by the US Government, the UN agencies, and the private sector. Currently, Mr. Thiam is the Chief of Party of the US Government funded Property Rights and Artisanal Diamond Development project being implemented in Liberia by the Associates in Rural Development (ARD—a Tetra Tech Company).

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Brendan Bromwich

Brendan Bromwich manages UNEP’s programmes in Darfur on environmental technical support for the humanitarian programme and on water resource management. Issues that the programmes address include governance of natural resources, livelihoods, energy, and drought preparedness. The work includes a combination of field research, analysis, advocacy and technical support to the wider UN led humanitarian response. The programme is built on a collaborative approach with Darfurian and international research institutions in order to best inform humanitarian practice within Darfur. He was a contributor to UNEP’s Sudan Post Conflict Environmental Assessment, and co-author of “Darfur: relief in a vulnerable environment”, “Darfur: water supply in a vulnerable environment” both for Tearfund and “Sharpening the Strategic Focus of Livelihoods Programming in the Darfur Region” in collaboration with Tufts University. He has established a task force for the introduction of alternative construction and energy technologies in Darfur comprising Darfurian universities, UN and NGOs. This task force is overseeing a number of studies to assist the development of strategy for the uptake of new technology. The first study assesses dynamics in the trade in timber and woodfuel and how these have been impacted by the conflict. The second study addresses options for alternative energy. Current studies on water resource management include a strategy document on drought preparedness, and an assessment of stakeholders with an interest in water resource management in Darfur. These programmes all build on Brendan’s earlier experience in Darfur working on the delivery of community-based water and sanitation projects that served pastoralist, displaced and farming communities. He has been based in Darfur or Khartoum since 2004. Prior to his work in Darfur he has worked as an engineering consultant specialising in strategic planning and water engineering. He worked on World Bank funded water and environment projects in China and Central Asia, and The Sultanate of Oman’s master plan for the water sector, which developed a national strategy for water supply over a 20-year period. Additional work in the UK, Ireland, Oman and the UAE focussed on the planning and design of water and environmental infrastructure. In 2003, he co-authored a book on theHydraulic design of side weirs. He holds a Master’s degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Imperial College London.

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Buenaventura Dolom

Buenaventura Dolom has over 20 years of professional experience in the Philippines in planning and implementing resource management projects at the national and community levels. He has managed multi-disciplinary resource management projects, working with local non-governmental organizations (NGOs), national government agencies, local government units, and people's organizations. Currently, Mr. Dolom is the Forest Sector Team Leader of the USAID- funded Philippine Environmental Governance (EcoGov) project. He holds a master's degree in Forestry with an emphasis in Social Forestry from the University of the Philippines-Los Baños.

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Carl Bruch

Carl Bruch is a Senior Attorney and Co-Director of International Programs at the Environmental Law Institute (ELI); he also co-chairs the IUCN Specialist Group on Armed Conflict and the Environment. Mr. Bruch's research focuses on making environmental law work. He has helped many countries develop and implement laws, policies, and institutional frameworks to effectively manage water resources, biodiversity, forests, and other natural resources. He is an authority on the means to prevent, reduce, mitigate, and compensate for damage to the environment during armed conflict. He edited and co-edited six books, including The Environmental Consequences of War: Legal, Economic, and Scientific Perspectives (Cambridge University Press 2000), and authored dozens of scholarly articles. He holds a JD from Northwestern School of Law of Lewis & Clark College, MA in physics from the University of Texas at Austin, and BS in physics from Michigan State University.

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Carlos Manuel Rodriguez

Carlos Manuel Rodriguez is Regional Vice-President for Mexico and Central America at Conservation International (CI). As Minister of Environment and Energy for the Republic of Costa Rica, a post he held until 2006, Mr. Rodriguez was a pioneer in the development of payment for ecosystem services (PES). A lawyer, politician and, above all, a conservationist, Rodriguez held various political posts at home, including Director of the National Parks Service. He is also founder and Board member of many environmental NGOs in Costa Rica and tropical research Institutes. Mr. Rodriguez was also a key player in the establishment of a multinational marine park — Las Baulas National Marine Park — and international efforts to eliminate bottom trawling and other unsustainable fishing practices. In recognition of his contributions to marine conservation, where he pushed to protect up to 25 percent, or 12.5 million hectares, of Costa Rica’s Exclusive Economic Zone, he was honored as the first ever recipient of the Global Ocean Conservation Award in 2005. As Minister of Environment, Costa Rica managed to curb the trends of logging and deforestation to achieve a national net growth of forested areas through natural regeneration and reforestation. In his role as CI’s regional vice president and director of CI’s Mexico and Central America program, Mr. Rodriguez is expanding the reach of the conservation solutions he spearheaded in Costa Rica. Mr. Rodriguez is leading conservation efforts throughout the region, from the United States-Mexico border through Panama. He also is developing a climate change mitigation and adaptation strategy throughout the Mexico and Central America region. Mr. Rodriguez also plays a critical role as CI’s worldwide ambassador and lead developing an institutional strategy for PES. He has been implementing a global fundraising plan for such compensation and climate change mitigation. In 2006, Mr. Rodriguez received the first annual Conservation Leadership Award from the Charlottesville, Va.-based blue moon fund in a ceremony at the Embassy of Costa Rica in Washington, D.C. The $150,000 award from the foundation recognized the significant advances made in both terrestrial and marine conservation during his service in the Costa Rican government.

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Carroll Muffett

Carroll Muffett is an independent attorney and consultant based in Washington, DC. He has served as Executive Director of the Climate Law & Policy Project, Deputy Campaigns Director for Greenpeace USA, and international counsel and Senior Director for International Conservation at Defenders of Wildlife. Prior to joining Defenders, Carroll worked as an attorney in private practice with Covington & Burling, and served as a legal fellow at the Center for International Environmental Law. He serves on the board of the Species Survival Network, and the board of editors for the Journal of International Wildlife Law and Policy, and is a member of the IUCN's Commission on Environmental Law. He has authored numerous articles and textbook chapters on international environmental law and policy,and is a recognized expert on international wildlife law. Carroll is a graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School and Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service.

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Casimiro V. Olvida

Casimiro V. Olvida is the Uplands and Governance Specialist of the USAID-funded Philippine Environmental Governance Project (EcoGov). He served as the Watershed Management Specialist of the JBIC-funded Southern Mindanao Integrated Coastal Zone Management Project (SMICZMP) and the Project Development Officer (PDO) of the USAID's Support with Implementing Fast Transition providing emergency livelihood assistance to former Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) combatants in conflict-affected areas in Mindanao. He holds a Master of Science in Forestry from UPLB as well as Bachelor of Science in Forestry from the same university.

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Chad Briggs

Chad Briggs is Minerva Chair of Energy & Environmental Security at the US Air Force's Air University. He is also a Senior Associate at Adelphi Research in Berlin, and a Fellow at the Institute for Environmental Security in The Hague. Dr. Briggs was previously Senior Adviser for International Security Affairs to the US Department of Energy's Energy and Environmental Security Directorate, and Professor of International Relations and Environmental Risk at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania. He holds a PhD in Political Science from Carleton University in Canada, has been a Visiting Scholar in Geography at University College London, and was a Fulbright professor to Budapest and Berlin. In the past he has also studied in Norway, Ireland, France and Serbia, and carried out extensive field research in eastern and southeastern Europe. His work focuses on the scenario planning for environmental changes and international security, environmental health risks in post-conflict and post-disaster regions, and security risks of climate and environmental change. Dr. Briggs has also published on water resource management, security implications of tropical disease, and conducting vulnerability assessments on environmentally fragile regions and systems. He was the project leader on abrupt climate change security assessments for GlobalEESE, an international project on environmental and energy foresight and warning.

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Charles John Kelly

Mr. Charles John Kelly has over 27 years of field experience in humanitarian assistance programs dealing with compound disasters, droughts, food insecurity, insect infestation, hurricanes, epidemics, floods, war and other emergencies in developing countries. Over this career Mr. Kelly has performed field and senior management tasks in over 18 disaster response operations. Recent professional work has included risk assessment and disaster management capacity building in Tajikistan, disaster risk reduction in the Sahel and assessing the environmental impacts during disasters (The Rapid Environmental Impact Assessment Project and Shelter and Environment issues for the Global Shelter Cluster). Mr. Kelly has worked in over 60 countries and published over 45 articles on disaster management, including on damage, needs, and rights assessment, disasters and mega cities, disaster management systems and disaster-environment linkages. An affiliate of the Benfield Hazard Research Centre, University College London, Mr. Kelly is a member of the International Research Committee on Disasters, the Society of Risk Analysis, The International Emergency Management Society and ProAct Network.

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Chizuru Aoki

Chizuru Aoki is Senior Technology Transfer Officer at the Secretariat of the Global Environment Facility (GEF). Prior to joining the GEF, she was Senior Programme Officer at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and led a programme to facilitate the transfer of Environmentally Sound Technologies in water and sanitation. In this capacity, she coordinated UNEP's project for Environmental Management of the Iraqi Marshlands. Chizuru first joined UNEP in 1993, helping to initiate the National Cleaner Production Centre network. She became a Fulbright Fellow in 1997 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), receiving her PhD in Technology, Management and Policy. Prior to returning to UNEP in 2003, She was a researcher at MIT, focusing on mitigating environmental impacts of the transportation sector in mega cities and making policy recommendations. In addition to her PhD, Chizuru holds a BS in Civil Engineering from Rice University and a MS in Environmental and Water Resources Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.

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Christian Webersik

Christian Webersik is an Associate Professor at the Centre for Development Studies at the University of Agder. Before that, he was a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science—United Nations University (JSPS-UNU) Postdoctoral Fellow at United Nations University’s Institute of Advanced Studies (UNU-IAS). Webersik has joined UNU-IAS in November 2007 to research links between drought and political violence. His general research interests are the role of natural resources in armed conflict, climate change and security, natural hazards and development and post-conflict economic recovery. Before joining UNU-IAS, Webersik briefly worked as report writer for UNDP’s Bureau of Crisis Prevention and Recovery. Before that, he worked at the Earth Institute at Columbia University where he was hosted by the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN). Following his doctorate, he was Assistant Professor of political science at Asmara University, Eritrea. He is holding a D.Phil. from Oxford University in political science where he studied the political economy of war and the role of natural resources in conflict in Somalia. In the past, Webersik worked in a number of conflict situations with UNDP, the UNHCR and UN OCHA. He worked for the UN Climate Change Secretariat in Bonn (UNFCCC). He continues to be interested in understanding how humans interact with their environment, to what extent environmental factors play a role in armed conflict, and the impact of natural hazards, such as tropical storms, on people’s well-being and livelihoods. At UNU-IAS, Webersik is with the Sustainable Development Governance Programme, contributing to the programme’s exploratory research initiative on the intersection of global environmental change and security.

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Christine Cheng

Christine Cheng is the Bennett Boskey Fellow in Politics and International Relations at Exeter College, University of Oxford. She is also completing her doctorate in politics at the University of Oxford (Nuffield College). Her dissertation is entitled "Extralegal Groups, Natural Resources, and Statebuilding in Post-Conflict Liberia". It deals with ex-combatant groups that have taken over natural resource areas in the aftermath of war and the problem that these groups pose for long-term statebuilding. Christine has conducted field research in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Côte d'Ivoire, South Africa, and Guatemala. In 2009, she was the Cadieux- Léger Fellow at the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada. Christine has worked for the UN, the World Bank, and the Wildlife Conservation Society. She holds an MPA from the Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University. As an undergraduate, she studied systems design engineering at the University of Waterloo. She maintains a blog at www.christinescottcheng.wordpress.com.

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Clive Wright

Clive Wright is a British career diplomat with over 30 years experience. He joined the Diplomatic Service from the Royal Marines in 1977 and has served overseas in embassies around the world, including in Turkey, Libya, South Africa, Austria and in the US. Interspersed between these overseas tours, Clive has had several periods in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in London. From February 2001 to December 2004, Clive was the head of the UK delegation to the Kimberly Process Certification Scheme (KPCS) negotiation. During that period he also started up and ran the Government Diamond Office, located in the Foreign and Commonwealth, the British Government's implementation arm for the KPCS. He has had a variety of roles during his career, ranging from accountancy through to arms control negotiations, to trade promotion, UN work and dealing with civil war financed through so-called blood diamonds. For the past four years in Washington Clive has focussed primarily on commercial aviation issues and in particular on transatlantic aviation security policy and the liberalisation of air service links.

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Cymie R. Payne

Cymie Payne is Director of the Global Commons Project and Associate Director of the California Center for Environmental Law and Policy at University of California, Berkeley School of Law, where she also teaches Climate Change Law & Policy, International Environmental Law, and International Tribunals and the Environment. At the United Nations Compensation Commission in Geneva, Switzerland, from 1999 to 2005, she was responsible for an international team of lawyers and technical experts assessing damage to the environment and public health from conflict in the Persian Gulf. This program resulted in landmark decisions on war reparations for environmental damage. Payne previously practiced environmental and natural resource law as an attorney-advisor at the U.S. Department of the Interior and in the environmental department of the law firm Goodwin Procter in Boston. Payne’s current research interests include the design of climate policy and international environmental governance. She holds a M.A. from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and a J.D. from University of California, Berkeley, School of Law.

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Cynthia Brady

Cynthia Brady is a Senior Conflict Advisor with USAID's Bureau for Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance in the Office of Conflict Management and Mitigation (DCHA/CMM). She is the technical lead on natural resources and conflict and the regional lead on conflict in the Great Lakes Region of Africa. Ms. Brady's primary responsibilities include identifying and analyzing sources of conflict and instability; supporting early responses to address the causes and consequences of fragility and violent conflict; and integrating conflict mitigation and management into USAID's analyses, strategies and programs. Previously, Ms. Brady served as a Foreign Affairs Officer with the U.S. Department of State. She holds a master's degree in international affairs from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University and a bachelor's degree in political science from Denison University.

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Daanish Mustafa

Daanish Mustafa is a senior lecturer in Environment, Politics, and Development at King's College, London. He received his BA, MA, and Ph.D. degrees from Middlebury College, University of Hawaii-Manoa, and University of Colorado-Boulder, respectively. A majority of his research activities have focused on the intersection of water resources, environmental hazards, and development geography. Dr. Mustafa has published scholarly articles on the critical geographies of violence and terror. He has focused mostly on Pakistan, but also has publications on Central America, the United States, and wider South Asia. Dr. Mustafa was the first recipient of the Association of American Geographer's Gilbert F. White Award. He has extensive experience working in the non-profit and development sector in Pakistan.

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Damiano A. Sguaitamatti

Damiano Sguaitamatti is Project Officer of the Mediation Support Project (MSP). He holds an M.A. from the University of Zurich in Political Philosophy and Comparative Constitutional Law. His previous experience includes being a business analyst in the private sector, a Public Information Assistant for UNHCR, and a Junior Researcher at swisspeace. While at swisspeace, he served as a consultant for the pre-talks in the Central African Republic, held in 2008 in Bangui. Mr. Sguaitamatti has been involved organizing capacity building workshops on negotiation and mediation for conflict parties in Darfur, and for civil society stakeholders, political actors, and local administration in Guinea. He specializes in the analysis of conflicts and peace processes in Central and Western Africa. Recent publications include Unpacking the Mystery of Mediation in African Peace Processes (with Simon J. A. Mason et al.), and Towards Realizing the Strengths of NGO Mediators (with David Lanz et al.).

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Dan Stigall

Dan Stigall is currently a Trial Attorney in the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of International Affairs, where he assists in formal cooperation efforts between the United States and countries throughout the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. Before joining the Department of Justice, he served as a military attorney in Europe, the Middle East, and throughout the United States – including assignments as a Special Assistant United States Attorney in both Kentucky and Virginia. Mr. Stigall holds an LL.M. (with highest honors) in International and Comparative Law from The George Washington University School of Law, and a J.D. and a B.A. from Louisiana State University. He is the author of a recently released book entitledCounterterrorism and the Comparative Law of Investigative Detention (Cambria 2009), and is the author of numerous law review articles on issues related to international law and comparative law.

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Daniel Franks

Daniel Franks is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Social Responsibility in Mining, Sustainable Minerals Institute, the University of Queensland, Australia. Daniel's research background traverses the policy, social and earth sciences, with a particular focus on the socio-environmental transformations that accompany the extraction of natural resources. Daniel has worked directly with communities and mining operations in Latin America, North America, and Australia. He has held senior positions within industry, and the Queensland State Government where he led a social and economic unit within the natural resources and water department. He holds a Bachelor of Science (Hons) in earth sciences from the University of Queensland and a PhD in environmental politics and policy from Griffith University, for which he was awarded a Chancellor's Medal. His PhD undertook a comparative political analysis of resource governance and conflict in Chile and Indonesia ( West Papua). Daniel co-teaches an undergraduate course on sustainable development and natural resources and regularly guest lectures for environmental management and community development courses. He was recently invited to author a chapter on social impact assessment and management in the extractive industries for the forthcoming edition of the prestigious Society for Mining Metallurgy & Exploration, Mining Engineering Handbook.

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David Jensen

David Jensen heads the Policy and Planning Team of the UN Environment Programme’s Post-Conflict and Disaster Management Branch, Geneva, Switzerland. Since 2000, he has worked on 10 post-conflict operations either as a technical expert or as a project coordinator. Jensen is now leading UNEP’s efforts to provide technical expertise on environment and conflict to the Peacebuilding Commission and the United Nations Development Group. He holds an Bachelor Degree in Geography from the University of Victoria and a Masters Degree in Biology from the University of Oxford. For more information, see http://postconflict.unep.ch.

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David M. Catarious Jr.

David M. Catarious is an Analyst and Project Director at CNA, a non-profit think tank which provides analysis and solutions for national security leaders and public sector organizations. Dr. Catarious is currently directing a group analysts and twelve retired flag and general officers in examining the Department of Defense's role in achieving a more energy- and climate-secure future. He was also a co-author of the pivotal CNA report National Security and the Threat of Climate Change. He also recently authored a chapter of the book Ideas for America's Future: Core Elements of a New National Security Strategy. His focus on environmental security spans the areas of climate change, national security, energy security, and homeland security. Prior to joining CNA, Dr. Catarious worked on energy and environmental policy issues for Rep. Ed Markey as a Congressional Science Fellow for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). While on the Hill, Dr. Catarious focused specifically on the issues of climate change, energy independence, biofuels, renewable energy, and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Dr. Catarious holds a doctorate in biomedical engineering from Duke University as well as masters and bachelors degrees in mathematics from Virginia Tech. He is also a Fellow of the Truman National Security Project.

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David Wilkie

David S. Wilkie is Director of Conservation Support at the Wildlife Conservation Society, and Adjunct Associate Professor at Boston College. He is a wildlife ecologist with a post-doctoral anthropology specialization in human behavioral ecology, and has spent the last 30 years trying to understand the socio-economic and institutional factors driving the conservation or unsustainable use of natural resources by rural families in central and west Africa, and in central and south America. Dr. Wilkie's research has focused on forager and farming subsistence practices and their impact on tropical forest resources. Other research interests include examining the impacts of trade and the commercialization of non-timber forest products on forest conservation; the role that logging plays in the commercial bushmeat trade; and the use of direct payments as a tool for biodiversity conservation in developing countries. He has published over 130 peer reviewed articles and books.

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Diana Klein

Diana Klein is a Project Manager with International Alert's Peacebuilding Issues Programme , where she leads on Alert's strategic engagement with multinational companies; outreach to and mobilisation of the domestic private sector in countries where Alert works; and strengthening policy and practice of the international aid community to integrate conflict-sensitivity in economic recovery efforts in countries emerging from conflict. Diana has extensive experience working on peacebuilding issues in Latin America and the Middle East. Previously, she managed a regional research, dialogue and advocacy network 'Economy and Conflict in the South Caucasus', engaging private sector actors across the conflict divides in the region, promoting dialogue among different sides of the conflicts, and using economic approaches to peace and reconciliation in the region. She holds an MA in Post-War Recovery and Development Studies from the University of York, UK, a certificate degree in Peace Studies from the European Peace University in Stadtschlaining, Austria and a BA in International Relations and Journalism from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel. Diana has edited and co-authored several publications and articles on the subject of conflict transformation, dialogue, economic recovery, and corruption, including 'From War Economies to Peace Economies in the South Caucasus' (2005); 'Corruption and Conflict in the South Caucasus' (2006) and 'Conflict-Sensitive Approaches to Value Chain Development in Conflict-Affected Countries' (2008).

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Dominik Zaum

Dominik Zaum is Reader in International Relations at the University of Reading, UK. He was Rose Research Fellow in International Relations at Lady Margaret Hall, University of Oxford (2004-6) and has previously worked for the Office of the High Representative in Bosnia (2000) and UNMIK in Kosovo (2003). His publications include The Sovereignty Paradox: The Norms and Politics of International Statebuilding (OUP 2007); The United Nations Security Council and War: The Evolution of Thought and Practice since 1945 (OUP 2008), co-edited with Vaughan Lowe, Adam Roberts, and Jennifer Welsh; and, with Adam Roberts, Selective Security: War and the United Nations Security Council since 1945 (IISS/Routledge 2008).

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Douglas E. Batson

Douglas E. Batson is a political geography analyst at the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), and is a staff member to the Foreign Names Committee of the U.S. Board on Geographic Names. He holds a Master of Education from Boston University and earned a Bachelor of Science in geography from Excelsior College entirely by examination. He previously worked for the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Department of Justice, and is retired from the U.S. Army Reserve. This chapter stems from the author's 2008 study, "Registering the Human Terrain: a Valuation of Cadastre."

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Douglas Perret Starr

Douglas Perret Starr served in the US Navy during World War II and the Korean War. He received a degree in Journalism from Louisiana State University, and worked as a reported for the Associate Press for 13 years. He also worked in public affairs for the Florida Department of Commerce. He taught in the Department of Journalism at the University of North Texas for 12 years, and in the Department of Journalism and the Department of Leadership, Education, and Communications at Texas A&M for 24 years before retiring as Professor Emeritus. He is Accredited in Public Relations (APR) by Public Relations Society of America, 1984; a member of the PRSA College of Fellows, 1992, and the Poynter Institute College of Fellows, 1993.

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Douglas Sharp

Douglas Sharp is an intern with the Environmental Law Institute, and is working on post-conflict natural resource management. He is currently a James B. Angell Scholar pursuing a B.A. in Public Policy, with a focus on environmental policy, at the University of Michigan's Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. At Michigan, his work centers around the intersection of policy, economics, and the environment, and he is a leader of a student group dedicated to raising awareness of social and ecological issues surrounding the coffee industry.

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Duncan Brack

Duncan Brack is a Senior Research Fellow of the Energy, Environment and Development Programme at Chatham House (the Royal Institute of International Affairs) in London in the UK. His work focuses on international environmental regimes and institutions, the interaction between environmental regulation and international trade rules, and international environmental crime. He runs Chatham House's programme of research and meetings on illegal logging and the trade in illegally logged timber, which includes maintaining the www.illegal-logging.info website, running six-monthly update and consultation meetings, and carrying out research, mainly into mechanisms to exclude illegal products from consumer markets.

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Eddie Rich

Eddie Rich has worked in development for almost 20 years. He worked for DFID in Angola between 1996-1998 when BP was seeking a concession. Working for an development organisation in Angola, he first experienced the limitations of aid in a resource-cursed environment, but could not see any clear solution. When he worked on the DFID White Paper on Making Globalisation Work for the Poor in 2000, he was first exposed to alternative governance approaches. When Publish What You Pay approached him in 2001 he was heading up the DFID Corporate Social Responsibility team. He was very interested in exploring the opportunity of some sort of multi-stakeholder process for governance of the oil sector. Over the next few years, Eddie was closely involved in DFID's role as the secretariat for the emerging Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI). Following 4 years in Kenya, Eddie was appointed Deputy Head of the EITI International Secretariat which was now based in Oslo. He has responsibility for Anglophone and Lusophone Africa and the Middle East and is delighted to be working again on a subject about which he feels so passionately.

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Elizabeth Koch-Ya’ari

Elizabeth Ya'ari is the Israeli Jordan River Rehabilitation Project Coordinator of EcoPeace / Friends of the Earth Middle East (FoEME). FoEME is a unique organization at the forefront of the environmental peacemaking movement. As a tri-lateral organization that brings together Jordanian, Palestinian, and Israeli environmentalists, FoEME works to promote sustainable development and advance peace efforts in the Middle East. FoEME has offices in Amman, Bethlehem, and Tel-Aviv and is a member of Friends of the Earth International, the largest grassroots environmental organization in the world. Elizabeth holds a BA in International Relations and has many years experience managing regional and international projects in the fields of peacebuilding, environmental peacemaking and cultural heritage.

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Emily E. Harwell

Emily E. Harwell is a natural resource analyst, human rights investigator, and partner with Natural Capital Advisors, LLC with nearly two decades of experience researching issues of resource conflict, ethnic identity, human rights, and governance reform. She earned her Ph.D. in environmental anthropology from Yale University, and her B.Sc. in forest ecology from the University of the South. Dr. Harwell is currently lead consultant on a project with the World Bank that examines the role of forests in fragile and conflict-affected states. She has also served as research coordinator and senior researcher on natural resources and social and economic rights for the East Timor Commission for Reception, Truth and Reconciliation, and as a research consultant to the Liberian Truth and Reconciliation Commission on economic crimes in the forestry and mining sectors. She has published research on resource extraction and human rights, post conflict reintegration of ex-combatants, and resource management reform.

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Erika Weinthal

Erika Weinthal (Ph.D Columbia University) is an Associate Professor of Environmental Policy at the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. Her research focuses on water cooperation and conflict, the political economy of the resource curse, and corporate social responsibility in the natural resource sector. Her field experience has centered on the former Soviet Union (Central Asia, the Caucasus, and Russia), the Middle East (Israel, the Palestinian Authority and Jordan), and Southern Europe. She is a member of the UNEP Expert Advisory Group on Environment, Conflict and Peacebuilding.

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Eugene Rutagarama

Eugene Rutagarama has over 20 years of experience working in conservation in the Great Lakes region of Africa with particular expertise in wildlife and park management, training, program coordination, contingency planning, emergency programming, and team building. In his current position as the Director for the International Gorilla Conservation Program (IGCP) he works on all aspects of the regional program design, management and technical support to the mountain gorilla and habitat conservation efforts of the three country programs. Eugene Rutagarama is from Rwanda and he is currently based in Kigali, Rwanda.

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Geoffrey D. Dabelko

Geoffrey D. Dabelko is director of the Environmental Change and Security Program (ECSP), a fourteen year-old nonpartisan policy forum on environment, population, health, and security issues at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC. He is also an adjunct professor at the Monterey Institute of International Studies. He has held prior positions with the Council on Foreign Relations, Foreign Policy, and Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. Dr. Dabelko’s current research focuses on environment, conflict, and cooperation with a special emphasis on environmental pathways to peacebuilding. He is principal investigator for ECSP’s Navigating Peace Water Initiative and co-editor with Ken Conca of Green Planet Blues: Environmental Politics from Stockholm to Johannesburg and Environmental Peacemaking. He is a member of advisory or editorial boards for the UN Environment Programme, International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change, Global Environmental Change, Wilton Park USA Foundation, Center for Unconventional Security Affairs at the University of California, Irvine, Pell Center for International Relations and Public Policy, Screenscope, Inc., and Circle of Blue. Dr. Dabelko received a Ph.D. in government and politics from the University of Maryland and an AB in political science from Duke University.

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George Bouma

George Bouma holds a BSc. and MSc. (Environmental Science) from Murdoch University, Perth and a Master of International Development from the University of Melbourne. He is an environment and development expert with 20 years experience. He initially began his working career as a Technical Officer in local government before he entered into consultancy where he developed his skills as an environmental scientist engaged in environmental management and impact assessment activities in infrastructure, land use development, water resources and protected area management. His international experience began in 2000 working with the UN mission in East Timor. Between 2004 and 2006 he worked as EIA Expert in Afghanistan with an Environmental Governance and Capacity Building Programme for UNEP. In 2007 George began working as a freelance consultant on short term assignments focusing on assistance to post conflict/disaster projects for UNEP in Indonesia, Mongolia, Rwanda, Ukraine, and China. In June 2009, he returned to working with peace keeping operations as Natural Resources Advisor to the DSRSG (Recovery and Governance) of UN Mission in Liberia. George is currently a Policy Advisor for the Energy and Environment Group in the Bureau for Development Policy at UNDP in New York.

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Gidon Bromberg

Gidon Bromberg is the Israeli Director of Friends of the Earth Middle East (FoEME). Mr. Bromberg speaks regularly on water, peace and security issues in various forums. He has presented before the UN Commission for Sustainable Development, the United States House Committee on Foreign Affairs, the European Parliament and the advisory meeting to the UN High Level Panel on Security. He is a member of the Israeli Inter-Ministerial Committee on the Future of the Dead Sea, of the Israel UNESCO World Heritage Committee and the Inter-Ministerial Committee for Sustainable Development in Israel. In 2007, Mr. Bromberg was invited to join the prestigious EastWest Institute's International Task Force for Preventive Diplomacy. In 2007 he was awarded a Fellowship at Yale University on global leadership. Mr. Bromberg is an attorney by profession and previously worked in public interest environmental law. He is a member of the Israel Bar Association. He holds a Bachelor of Economics and a law degree from Monash University in Australia. As a fellow of the New Israel Fund, he completed a master's degree in international environmental law at the American University in Washington D.C. He has published over twenty academic and popular publications concerning Middle East environmental policy and water security issues. FoEME's three co-Directors were honored by TIME Magazine as Environmental Heroes of 2008 and were granted the prestigious Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship in 2009.

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Glaucia Boyer

Glaucia Boyer works as a DDR Policy Specialist at the United Nations Development Programme/Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery in Geneva, Switzerland. She has been currently working in two functions: 1) as the facilitator of the Geneva end of the UN inter-agency process on DDR (coordination, policy and training issues); and 2) as the natural resource management focal point in the conflict team/DDR team. Glaucia has been working with the United Nations since 1994 in different agencies (OCHA, DPKO, ILO, UNDP and UNU) and supporting DDR programmes in different countries (Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia/Aceh, Niger, Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Sri Lanka and Sudan). She has a law degree from the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and a PhD from the Graduate Institute of International Studies, in Geneva, Switzerland. She is married and has two children.

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Harrison Mitchell

Harrison Mitchell is a researcher and analyst specializing in investigations of corruption, beneficiation, commodities and minerals. He is the co-director of Resource Consulting Services, a research and investigations consultancy and has previously worked for the Financial Times as a senior researcher and Global Witness' Conflict Diamond campaign. Professional landmarks include publishing groundbreaking investigations on militarized mining for DFID, the London School of Economic and the Financial Times, working as a researcher and writer on several investigations into corruption and conflict in Central Asia and Africa, and performing country audits of China and Lebanon for the Kimberley Process Certification Scheme for Rough Diamonds. Harrison has worked in Africa, the Middle East, South America and Asia. He is currently completing an MSc in Human Rights at the London School of Economics.

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Harry N. Scheiber

Harry N. Scheiber is the Riesenfeld Chair Professor of Law and History, School of Law, University of California, Berkeley. He is co-director of the Law of the Sea Institute and is director of the Sho Sato Program in Japanese and US Law, both in the School of Law. Previously he served as associate dean and as chair of the UC Berkeley Jurisprudence and Social Policy doctoral program. For many years a member and then chair of the California Sea Grant Program, he has taught and conducted research programs at UC Berkeley on ocean resources and international law since 1981. Scheiber has written extensively on Japanese-US relations in ocean resource management including monographs in the journal Ecology Law Quarterly and a book, Inter-Allied Conflicts and Ocean Law, 1945-53 : The Allied Command’s Revival of Japanese Whaling and Marine Fisheries (2001), and is now completing a major historical study of the quest for sustainable development in the marine fisheries and the origins of modern ocean law. He has published over 200 articles in journals of law, economics, history and marine studies, including articles on the Biodiversity Convention and Law of the Sea, on fisheries oceanography history, and on the crisis of the IWC. Among his other recent work in ocean resources and law are the books Law of the Sea: The Common Heritage and Emerging Challenges (2000), Bringing New Law to Ocean Waters (co-ed with D.Caron,2004), and The Oceans in the Nuclear Age: Legacies and Risks (co-ed D. Caron, 2010). He has also written widely in the fields of economic and legal history of the United States; and he is editor and contributing author of a series of books and journal symposia on Japanese law in comparative perspective. His doctorate was earned at Cornel University, and he was awarded an honorary D.Jur. from Uppsala University, Sweden. Scheiber is an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has twice been a Guggenheim Fellow and a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Sciences at Stanford.

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Helen Young

Helen Young, PhD. is a Research Director at the Feinstein International Center at Tufts University and a Professor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts. She is Director of the Tufts Darfur Livelihoods Program, which combines action research, capacity development and institutional change in humanitarian, recovery and peace-building policies and programs. This work is in partnership with UNEP. She is also currently researching migration and remittance flows among Sudanese diaspora in Egypt and Libya. Her professional career started in 1985 in Ethiopia and Sudan for Oxfam, and since then she has worked for UNHCR, the World Bank, FAO, WFP and others in Africa. Since joining Tufts in 1998, she has developed an applied research program into livelihoods, conflict, and public nutrition, with grants from DFID, Ford Foundation, WFP, UNEP, FAO, Mellon and others. In 2002 she developed the Sphere Minimum Standards on food security. Dr. Young is Co-Editor of the journal Disasters: The Journal of Disaster Studies, Policy and Management (1998-present) and is author of a wide range of books and publications. She holds a B.Sc. from Oxford Polytechnic and a Ph.D. from the Council for National Academy Awards, Bournemouth University, UK.

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Ian D. Hannam

Ian D. Hannam (Dip. Agr, Sci, BA, M.Litt, PhD), is Adjunct Associate Professor at the Australian Centre for Agriculture and Law, University of New England Australia. Ian is Chair of the IUCN Commission on Environmental Law Specialist Group for Sustainable Use of Soil and Desertification. He is widely published in international journals, books and specialist articles on sustainable land use management, ecosystem management and natural resource governance. Ian has worked with various agencies within the UN system on environmental law reform in many countries, including China, Mongolia, Iceland, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Czech Republic, Serbia, Thailand, to name a few.

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Indra de Soysa

Dr. Indra de Soysa is Professor of Political Science and the Director of Globalization Research at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) in Trondheim, Norway and Associate Scholar at the Centre for the Study of Civil War, International Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), Norway. He has a PhD from the University of Alabama (USA). His primary research focuses on issues of globalization and economic, political, and social outcomes as well as the causes of political violence and civil war. He has a special interest in the question of governing natural resources for development and peace. De Soysa has published a number of articles in the leading journals and is on the editorial committees of the Journal of Peace Research, International Studies Quarterly, and American Journal of Political Science.

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Inka Weissbecker

Dr. Inka Weissbecker works in the field of mental health and psychosocial issues in the context of relief and development. She completed her MPH at the Harvard School of Public Health, with emphasis in global health and humanitarian studies. Dr. Weissbecker also has a PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Louisville and she completed her clinical psychology internship with focus on public policy at the University of South Florida. She has served as an NGO representative of the International Union of Psychological Science to the United Nations (ECOSOC and DPI) and on the NGO Committee on Mental Health in New York. She has published several peer-reviewed manuscripts and she has been involved in research and mental health service delivery projects in Belize, Tanzania, Sierra Leone and Gaza.

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Ivar Kolstad

Ivar Kolstad is a Senior Researcher at the Chr. Michelsen Institute (CMI), and head of the CMI Human Rights Programme. He has conducted research on corruption, natural resources, business ethics, inequality, FDI, trade, aid, and public financial management. He has a PhD in game theory from the Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration.

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J. Andrew Grant

Dr. J. Andrew Grant is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Studies at Queen's University. In 2009, Dr. Grant received an Early Researcher Award from the Government of Ontario. The award enables Dr. Grant to serve as the Principal Investigator of a research project that examines governance and competitiveness in mining. During the 2005-2006 academic year, he was a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Postdoctoral Fellow with the Center for International and Comparative Studies at Northwestern University. From April to June 2003, he was an intern at the Campaign for Good Governance in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Dr. Grant is co-editor of The New Regionalism in Africa (with Fredrik Söderbaum, Ashgate 2003), editor of Darfur: Reflections on the Crisis and the Responses (QCIR, 2009), and co-editor of The Research Companion to Regionalisms (with Timothy M. Shaw and Scarlett Cornelissen, Ashgate forthcoming). His recent publications focus on conflict diamonds and the Kimberley Process, regional security, transitional justice, post-conflict reconstruction, and governance issues relating to natural resource extraction. He has conducted field research in Sierra Leone, Ghana, Botswana, Namibia, and South Africa. Dr. Grant is also a Senior Fellow with the Queen's Centre for International Relations, a Faculty Associate with the Queen's Southern African Research Centre, a Research Fellow with the Centre for Foreign Policy Studies at Dalhousie University, and the Chair of the International Political Science Association Research Committee #40 (New World Orders).

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J. Carter Ingram

Jane Carter Ingram obtained a B.S. in biology from the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the School of Geography and the Environment at the University of Oxford. She also completed a Post-Doctoral fellowship at the Earth Institute of Columbia University. Dr. Ingram's research has focused on: the use of satellite imagery integrated to map patterns and drivers of deforestation and forest degradation; the impacts of environmental change on ecosystem services for rural communities; and the role of natural resource management in coastal disaster mitigation and recovery. She currently works at the Wildlife Conservation Society as the Assistant Director of Conservation Support and TransLinks, a USAID funded program working to further the integration of biodiversity conservation, poverty reduction and sound governance in developing countries. She has published more than 20 articles and book chapters on conservation in the context of poverty reduction.

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J. David Stanfield

J. David Stanfield is a Land Tenure Specialist with over 35 years of experience in teaching and international development research, and technical assistance relating to land issues through the Land Tenure Center at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, and Terra Institute. Dr. Stanfield has provided technical assistance and applied research relating to land tenure and land administration issues through programs funded by the Asian Development Bank, Inter American Development Bank, World Bank, USAID, and UN-Habitat in over 20 countries including Afghanistan, Albania, the Bahamas, Brazil, Chile, Nicaragua, the Republic of Georgia, and Trinidad and Tobago. He is presently Co-Director of a Terra Institute program for building linkages between communities and key stakeholder organizations for resolving land and other resource issues. Dr. Stanfield holds a Ph.D. in Communication from Michigan State University, is Senior Scientist Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, and is President of Terra Institute.

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J. Todd Walters

J. Todd Walters is the Founder and Executive Director of International Peace Park Expeditions which runs experiential peacebuilding expeditions, accredited academic expeditions, and professional collaborative mapping initiatives. He holds a Masters in International Peace and Conflict Resolution from the School of International Service at American University, focusing his research on international peace parks and environmental peacebuilding. Mr. Walters is a National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) certified adventure guide, and has led expeditions in dozens of locations around the globe. He is currently based on the east coast, near Boston, Massachusetts. Mr. Walters' published works include a chapter entitled "Environmental Peacebuilding: Extending the Framework for Collaboration," and a compilation of selected papers from the 2007 Parks, Peace and Partnerships Conference at Waterton Glacier International Peace Park, published by Calgary University Press. While at American University, he received the Petra Kelley Memorial Award for activism on environmental and peace issues.

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Jana Kovandzic

Jana Kovandzic is a MSc student of the Environmental Science, Policy, and Management (MESPOM) joint program of Central European University, Lund University, and Manchester University. She holds a BA in Political Science from the University of Belgrade. She was a student of Belgrade Open School, Department for Advanced Undergraduate Studies, in the EU and the Balkans Program. In 2007, she was a delegate of Republic of Serbia at the 5th UNESCO Youth Conference in Paris. She is an affiliate of the Earth Charter (EC) and was a part of EC Youth Leadership Team as a representative of Europe and Central Asia. At the UN Association of Serbia, she worked as a coordinator of projects dealing with climate change and environmental educatio.. Her current research focuses on distributed economies of the small islands and their development of sustainability model. Her thesis topic deals with the strategies of Balkan countries to harmonize their environmental policies with acquis communautaire, in their process of association to the EU.

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Jean-François Pinera

Jean-François Pinera, PhD, is a water and sanitation specialist with over fifteen years experience of project management, emergency operations, and research in Africa, Asia and the Caucasus. His interest includes the response to emergencies (especially in urban areas) and water supply and sanitation for low-income urban communities. He has work with a wide range of organisations including Médecins Sans Frontières , his most recent employer, the International Committee of the Red Cross, Action Contre la Faim and UNICEF. He also spent three years as a research scholar at Water, Engineering and Development Centre, part of Loughborough University in the United Kingdom. He is currently an independent consultant.

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Jennifer Brick Murtazashvili

Jennifer Brick Murtazashvili is an Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh. She is currently working on a book on village and customary governance in rural Afghanistan for which she conducted qualitative interviews and focus groups in more than 30 Afghan villages across six provinces. In the policy world, she has managed U.S. Government democracy assistance for USAID in Uzbekistan and drafted legislative materials for the new Afghan Parliament as a consultant for the UNDP in Kabul. She has lived for more than seven years in various parts of Central Eurasia, primarily in Uzbekistan and Afghanistan. Jennifer was a research fellow at the Institute for Legal Studies at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Dr. Murtazashvili holds an Ph.D. in Political Science and an M.A. in Agricultural and Applied Economics from the University of Wisconsin - Madison.

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Jennifer McCarthy

Jennifer McCarthy is a Canadian currently pursuing a PhD in Geography at King's College London. Her research focuses on the connections between participatory development, village-level power structures and vulnerability in rural northern Afghanistan. Jennifer has worked with various international non-governmental organizations in Canada, Afghanistan, Burma and Indonesia since 2002. She is also currently a consultant with the UK's Stabilisation Unit and coordinates two non-profit organizations advocating for social justice in Afghanistan.

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Jennifer Wallace

Jennifer Wallace is a PhD candidate in the Department of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland and an affiliate of the Harrison Program on the Future Global Agenda. Her research interests primarily focus on environmental linkages to conflict, with particular attention to natural resource management and environmental degradation. Before attending the University of Maryland, Jennifer worked in Switzerland as a training course coordinator at the Geneva Centre for Security Policy, part of Switzerland's contribution to the Partnership for Peace, a program of practical bilateral cooperation between individual partner countries and NATO. She holds a BA from Sarah Lawrence College in Bronxville, NY; a Certificate of Advanced Studies in Environmental Diplomacy from the University of Geneva; and an MA in political science from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva.

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Jeremy Allouche

Dr. Jeremy Allouche is currently a Research Fellow at the Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex. He previously worked at the University of Oxford, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, at ETH Lausanne where he was the director of the Water Institutions and Management Competence Centre, at the Swiss Graduate Institute of Public Administration, and at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva. His fields of interests are public private partnerships, the governance and regulation of water supply and sanitation systems, service delivery and post-conflict reconstruction, water security, and transboundary water conflicts. Dr. Allouche has most notably published/edited three books on the topic: Water privatisation: Transnational Corporations and the Re-regulation of the water industry (Spon Press, 2001), The Multi-Governance of Water (State University of New York Press, 2006) Water and Liberalisation: European water scenarios (International Water Association Publishing, 2007).

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Jeremy Lind

Jeremy Lind is a Research Fellow on the Vulnerability and Poverty Reduction Team at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex. His research examines livelihood dynamics in conflict areas, the relationship between vulnerability and violence, and the difficulties of aid delivery in such contexts, with a regional focus on north-east Africa. Before joining IDS, he was Lecturer of Human Geography at the University of Sussex, where he led and contributed to a range of undergraduate and graduate courses relating to environment, conflict and development. Previously he was Research Officer at the Centre for Civil Society at the London School of Economics, where he researched changing approaches on aid and civil society in the post-9/11 context. He is co-author with Jude Howell of "Counter-Terrorism, Aid and Civil Society: Before and After the War on Terror" (Palgrave, 2009), co-editor with Jude Howell of "Civil Society Under Strain: The War on Terror Regime, Civil Society and Aid Post-9/11" (Kumarian Press, 2009), and co-editor with Kathryn Sturman of "Scarcity and Surfeit: The Ecology of Africa's Conflicts" (Institute of Security Studies/ACTS, 2002).

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Jessica Troell

Jessica Troell is an attorney and the Director of the International Water Program at the Environmental Law Institute (ELI). Ms. Troell has extensive experience in water law and policy, with a particular focus on participatory water governance, transboundary water management, adaptation to climate change in the water sector, and water-related conflict management. At ELI, she works with NGOs, governments, the private sector, and universities throughout Africa, Latin America, and Asia to create, implement, and enforce sustainable water laws, policies, and management mechanisms. Prior to joining ELI, Ms. Troell was a law fellow with the Mandela Institute of Law at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa and a Peace Corps volunteer in Morocco. She has also worked at the International Environmental Law Office of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Natural Resources Defense Counsel. Ms. Troell is the author of several articles and book chapters and a graduate of Oberlin College and the University of Virginia School of Law.

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Jill Shankleman

Jill Shankleman is Director of J. Shankleman Limited, a business consulting firm she founded in 2000. As a consultant, she has worked with oil and gas firms to help them assess the social impact of investment in the former Soviet Union, Angola, Algeria, Indonesia, China, Bolivia, South Africa, and elsewhere. She was a Senior Fellow at the United States Institute of Peace (2003 — 2004), and Director of Environmental Resources Management (London, 1987 — 2000).

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Jim Jarvie

James Jarvie is Director for Climate Change, Environment and Natural Resource Management for Mercy Corps, directing strategic planning and providing technical expertise to its programs globally. He is a biologist with 20 years of experience in natural resource management and conservation in Southeast Asia, conducting research, assessments, leading projects, and developing strategic plans for international donors, universities and NGOs. Dr. Jarvie's work has encompassed natural resource governance, forest-based conflict, ethical timber trading, climate change adaptation and mitigation, and protected area design. He joined Mercy Corps following the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami as Country Director for the Sri Lanka Country Program. While managing emergency response and recovery programming, Dr. Jarvie integrates disaster risk reduction, conflict management, and environmental sustainability into the country wide strategic plans.

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Jim Schweithelm

Jim Schweithelm is a Senior Associate at ARD, Inc., an international development consulting firm, and also works as a freelance consultant. He has worked for three decades on natural resource management issues in Asia, with a focus on forest management and conservation. Dr. Schweithelm worked in many countries in Southeast and South Asia, having spent eight years in Indonesia, two years in Nepal, and significant periods in mainland Southeast Asia. He has provided technical services to a number of international development organizations and international NGOs, led a three-year USAID-funded project to analyze forest conflict in Asia, and recently led the design of large REDD projects in Indonesia. He holds a PhD in Geography from the University of Hawaii where he was affiliated with the East-West Center, a Master's degree in Natural Resource Policy and Planning from Cornell University, and a Bachelor's degree in Engineering from the US Military Academy.

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Johann Jenson

Johann Jenson is a technical consultant to the UNEP/UNESCO Great Apes Survival Partnership (GRASP). Johann is part of a core-team of biologists, primatologists, and policy experts that identify and implement strategies for the survival of great ape populations as flagship species for terrestrial conservation efforts in equatorial Africa and south-east Asia. He holds a Master's in Environment and Management and a BA in Political Science and European Studies. He has worked on several conservation and development projects throughout sub-Saharan Africa, South-East Asia, South and Central America and Canada, and as a communications consultant to UNEP, the Government of Sierra Leone and the Canadian Federal Government. His professional interests include transboundary environmental cooperation, conflict resolution, web-based environmental communications, and the role of civil society in environmental policy-making.

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Johannes Refisch

Johannes Refisch holds a Diploma degree in animal ecology. He has held several scientific positions at the University of Bayreuth, Germany, the Natural Museum in Munich, Germany, the University of Basel, Switzerland, and the University of Alaska, USA. Mr. Refisch also acted as the Co-Director of the Tai Monkey Project in Ivory Coast coordinating ecological and conservation—oriented research. The results of his study led to his PhD in 2001 as well as recognition in the form of a Research Conservation Award from WWF and the Centre Suisse in the same year. Johannes gained natural resource management (NRM) experiencein conflict and post-conflict countries throughout his project work in the Côte d´Ivoire/Liberia border area and the larger Virunga Landscape, the border area between the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Rwanda and Uganda. He came first to the Virunga region in the early 90’s when he worked as a volunteer for GTZ. He later worked as a programme manager for the International Gorilla Conservation Programme (IGCP), a coalition of African Wildlife Foundation, Fauna and Flora International and WWF, which has been facilitating a transboundary dialogue in the Virungas for more than 10 years. Since 2006, Johannes Refisch has been working as a project manager for the UNEP and UNESCO partnership on great apes (GRASP). He has a wide experience in natural resource management and has assisted GTZ, IGCP, WWF and UNEP in designing, supervising and implementing NRM projects.

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John A. Gould

John A. Gould is Chair and Associate Professor of Political Science at Colorado College. He received a Ph.D. from Columbia University, an M.A.L.D. from Tufts University, and a B.A. from Williams College. Dr. Gould maintains a research program in the fields of comparative and international political economy with a particular focus on the relationship of post-communist economic policies with political, domestic, and international institutions. His regional focus is on Central and Eastern Europe and the Balkans. He has (co)published refereed journal articles in Comparative European Politics, Europe-Asia Studies, Business and Politics, and Review of International Political Economy. Dr. Gould's book, The Politics of Privatization: Wealth and Power in Postcommunist Europe, will be published shortly with Lynne Rienner Press. He has won a number of teaching awards, including the Ray O. Werner award for Exemplary Teaching in the Liberal Arts, and the Lloyd E. Worner Teacher of the Year.

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John Stokes

John Stokes is currently a senior at Harvard University, where he is pursuing a B.A. in Linguistics. In 2010, he worked as a Research and Publications intern at the Environmental Law Institute. While at ELI, his work focused on post-conflict natural resource management, and he has a particular interest in the role natural resources play in re-establishing governance after conflict. John has also worked with a small Virginia NGO to improve local land-use governance and to protect the effectiveness of the conservation easement as a tool for land preservation.

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John W. Bruce

John W. Bruce has worked on land policy and law in developing countries for 40 years, primarily in Africa. He is a former Director of the Land Tenure Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, and between 1996 and 2006, he served as Senior Counsel (Land Law) at the World Bank. He currently heads a small consulting firm, Land and Development Solutions International. He has published extensively on land policy and law, most recently Land Law Reform: Achieving Development Policy Objectives (World Bank, 2006) and 'Land and Business Formalization for Legal Empowerment of the Poor, Strategic Overview Paper' (ARD for USAID, 2007).

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John Woods

John Woods was born in Gorlue, Lofa County, Liberia. He attended the College of Forestry at the University of Liberia, and obtained an Undergraduate Degree at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky, USA in 1966. Mr. Woods was awarded a Master’s Degree in Natural Resource Economics at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada in 1970. In 1972, he established the Concession Secretariat in the Ministry of Finance in Liberia, providing technical, research and advisory services to the government on fiscal and legal obligations of concession and concession-like arrangements from the extraction of natural resources (mainly, iron ore, diamonds, gold and timber). Mr. Woods became the Managing Director of the Forestry Development Authority one year after it was founded in Liberia. He also headed the Project Department of the Fund for Cooperation and Development of the Economic Community of West Africa States in Lome, Togo. He coordinated the Liberia Forest Initiative in Liberia, and has resumed his position as the Managing Director of the Forestry Development Authority in Liberia.

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Jon Unruh

Jon Unruh is a Professor in the Department of Geography at McGill University. Professor Unruh’s research and policy work over the past 20 years has dealt with post-conflict land tenure in the developing world. His past endeavors have focused on conflict resolution, land policy and law, legal pluralism, approaches to reconciling customary and formal tenure systems, and agriculture in postwar and peace-building scenarios. His research and policy experience includes work in Somalia, Mozambique, East Timor, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Madagascar, Zanzibar, Ethiopia, Cameroon, Uganda, Peru, Central America, and Zambia. His work in Mozambique and East Timor built field research into the government’s recovering policy and lawmaking programs. In Sierra Leone and Ethiopia he worked on the connection between post-conflict land tenure and food security. In Uganda, Cameroon, and Zambia he examined the linkages between customary evidence and land claims. And in Somalia he worked on issues of “critical resource tenure” during conflict. He holds a PhD from the University of Arizona (Geography and Regional Development), MS from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (Environmental Studies – Land Resources), and BA from the University of Kansas-Lawrence (Environmental Studies).

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Jorge Caillaux

Jorge Caillaux is a Peruvian lawyer who graduated from Universidad Católica of Perú, and began working in the field of environmental law in Peru in 1978. He co-founded the Peruvian Society for Environmental Law in 1986. As head of the Ad Hoc Multisectoral National Committee in Peru he participated in drafting the 1990 Code of the Environment and Natural Resources and its subsequent rules of application. Dr. Caillaux served as CEL-IUCN Vice Chair for South America from 1997 to 2004. He is an international consultant in matters related to environmental law and policy, and is also President of the International Board of Fundación Futuro Latinoamericano—FFLA—based in Quito, Ecuador. Dr. Caillaux also practices private law as a Legal Director of a Peruvian group of corporations called Corporación Drokasa, Agrokasa and Drokasa Perú S.A.

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Juan Dumas

Juan Dumas is a conflict engagement and public policy expert, with wide ranging experience across Latin America. He is now a consultant for the Office of the Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman (CAO) of the World Bank Group and for UNEP's Post-Conflict Disaster Management Branch. In 2009, he completed a seven-year term as Executive Director of Fundación Futuro Latinamericano (FFLA), a non-profit organization based in Quito, Ecuador, that is committed to promoting constructive dialogue to address environmental policymaking and conflict management. Under his tenure, FFLA consolidated various conflict prevention and management initiatives, and built the capacities of key stakeholders to address environmental conflict. As a strong believer in the role of public policy, Mr. Dumas actively works to engage the public and private sectors in policy dialogues for sustainable development. His goal is to keep setting regional precedents for how to bring together conflicting parties in Latin American fragmented societies.

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Juan Mayr Maldonado

Juan Mayr Maldonado is the Former Minister for the Environment (1988-2002), a professional photographer, and founder of a Colombian NGO to protect the ecosystems and indigenous peoples of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. He has pursued a vision for working at all levels — grassroots, national, regional and international — for the protection of ecosystems and biodiversity as the mainstay for cultural diversity, sustainable livelihoods and good governance. Other national and international positions include President of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD), Vice-President for the World Conservation Union (IUCN); member of high-level panels for the UN and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), and member of the National Conciliation Commission; advisor to the UN Resident Coordinator and Humanitarian Coordinator for Colombia.

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Judy Oglethorpe

Judy Oglethorpe is currently Managing Director of the Climate Adaptation Program at the World Wildlife Fund (WWF-US). For the past eight years she has worked on integrating social, economic, and political issues into biodiversity conservation at several scales, and ran WWF's Population, Health, Gender and Environment Program. Previously she was Executive Director of the Biodiversity Support Program, a USAID-funded consortium of WWF, The Nature Conservancy and World Resources Institute, where she developed a project that identified adverse impacts of armed conflict on the environment and ways to mitigate them. She has 14 years of experience in Southern and East Africa where her work focused on topics including biodiversity; community-based natural resource management; ecotourism development; environmental impact assessment; institutional development and training; and conflict resolution. Ms. Oglethorpe has a masters degree in Environmental Management from the University of London and a bachelors degree in Ecological Science from the University of Edinburgh.

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Juha I. Uitto

Juha I. Uitto is Evaluation Adviser in the UNDP Evaluation Office in charge of programmatic evaluations in Asia and the Pacific and Europe and CIS. He managed the Evaluation of the Role and Contributions of UNDP in Environment and Energy. A geographer by training, he holds an MSc from the University of Helsinki in his native Finland and PhD in Social and Economic Geography from the University of Lund in Sweden. Before joining UNDP, he worked, i.a., in the Global Environment Facility and as a consultant in international development, and was for nine years on the faculty of the United Nations University.

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K. W. James Rochow

K. W. James Rochow is the President of the Trust For Lead Poisoning Prevention and an environmental law and policy consultant headquarted in Washington, D.C. He has helped orchestrate the global phase-out of leaded gasoline and initiate integrated approaches to toxics pollution and environmental health. Most recently, Rochow has worked on natural resource sector reform and failed state reconstruction in West Africa for the World Bank, UNDP, and the Government of Liberia. He has also taught international environmental law and policy at numerous universities in the U.S. and abroad, most recently at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

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Ken Conca

Ken Conca is a professor of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland and Director of the Harrison Program on the Future Global Agenda. His research and teaching focus on global environmental politics, environmental policy, social movements in world politics, and peace and conflict studies. He is the author/editor of seven books, including The Crisis of Global Environmental Governance (Routledge, 2008);Governing Water (MIT Press, 2006); Green Planet Blues (Westview Press, 2004); Environmental Peacemaking (Johns Hopkins/Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 2002); and Confronting Consumption (MIT Press, 2002). He is a recipient of the International Studies Association’s Chadwick Alger Prize for best book on international organization (for Governing Water) and a two-time recipient of ISA’s Harold & Margaret Sprout Award for best book on international environmental affairs (for Governing Water and Confronting Consumption). Dr. Conca is associate editor of the MIT Press journal Global Environmental Politics; a member of the Scientific Steering Committee on Global Environmental Change and Human Security; and a member of the UN Environment Programme’s Expert Advisory Group on Environment, Conflict and Peacebuilding.

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Koffi K. Michel Yoboué

Michel K. K. Yoboue has been teaching Business Law and Deputy Academic Director at the University Institute of Abidjan in Côte d'Ivoire. Leading the fight against corruption and lack of transparency in the Ivorian oil and mineral sectors, he is a member of the National Council of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (CN-ITIE), established by the Ivorian Government. From 2006 to 2009 and from 2012 to 2015, he was also the National Coordinator of the Publish What You Pay Campaign in Côte d'Ivoire. Since March 2008, Mr. Yoboue is the Executive Director of the Research and Advocacy Group on Extractive Industries (GRPIE) where he has been responsible for implementing the Kimberley Process in Côte d'Ivoire. Mr. Yoboue has a diploma in the comprehensive study of fundamental business law and a Masters degree in social and environmental management, development of land resources from the University of Toulouse. Mr Yoboue is currently preparing a PhD on environmental impacts in artisanal diamond mining at Paul Sabatier University of Toulouse in France.

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Lalanath de Silva

Lalanath De Silva was a public interest litigator and advocate for over 20 years. He served the Government of Sri Lanka for two years as Legal Consultant to the Ministry of Environment and Forests. From 2002-2005 he was a Legal Officer in the Environmental Claims Unit of the United Nations Compensation Commission in Geneva, where he helped process war reparations claims handled by the Commission to monitor, assess, restore, and compensate for environmental damage resulting from the 1991 Gulf War. Mr. De Silva joined the World Resources Institute in 2005 as Director of The Access Initiative. He recently co-authored Voice and Choice: Opening the Door to Environmental Democracy and A Seat at the Table: Including the Poor in Decisions for Development and Environment. Mr. De Silva qualified as a lawyer from the Sri Lanka Law College and has a Master of Laws degree from the University of Washington, Seattle.

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Laura Jean Palmer-Moloney

Dr. Laura Jean Palmer-Moloney brings her experience and expertise in anthropology, cultural geography, and hydrology to her study of the Helmand River watershed, a region that is the focus of her research agenda. From 1998-2009, Dr. Palmer-Moloney was an academic professor of geography, specializing in political and military geography as well as hydrology/wetlands resource management. In February 2009 she accepted an appointment as Visiting Research Scientist with the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency and began a study of the Helmand River watershed. She now works as Senior Research Geographer (Department of Defense Civil Servant) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research & Development Center (ERDC) in Alexandria, VA. In her role in the Department of Defense, Dr. Palmer-Moloney is the project manager of Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD)/ERDC "Technology & Training Insertion in COIN Environment" effort, a program that applies socio-cultural knowledge gained from the SMA/RCU program. She participated in the OSD Strategic Multi-layered Analysis/Rich Contextual Understanding "Helmand Deep Dive," and she is an active participant in the USG InterAgency Water Group, the Environment Community of Analysis, and the interagency Water Resources Working Group. Dr. Palmer-Moloney and Dr. Alex Dehgan (DOS) co-authored the paper "Water Security and Scarcity: Potential Destabilization in Western Afghanistan," in Perspectives on Political and Social Stability Impacted by Global Crises - A Social Science Context, published jointly by Strategic Multilayer Assessment (SMA) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Research and Development Directorate (Jan 2010).

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Leah Kintner

Leah Kintner is an intern with World Wildlife Fund's (WWF) Humanitarian Partnerships program, supporting projects that ensure the incorporation of sustainable environmental practices in post-disaster recovery and reconstruction efforts. Prior to working at WWF, she obtained a B.S. in Biology and was involved with international conservation efforts through her work at zoos and aquariums around the country. Ms. Kintner is currently pursuing a M.A. in International Peace and Conflict Resolution, with an emphasis in Global Environmental Policy, at American University's (AU) School of International Service. At AU, she engages in related activities, including joining a civil-military dialogue group, participating in an ongoing student led discussion of the post-development paradigm, and co-organizing a forum exploring the multidisciplinary consequences of climate change. Ms. Kintner's composite areas of focus include environmental peacebuilding, environmental security, and environmental policy as it pertains to conflict and post-conflict settings.

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Lisa Goldman

Lisa Goldman is a Senior Attorney and Counsel at ELI. Her research interests include forestry and biodiversity in Liberia, transboundary environmental impact assessment, post-conflict natural resource management, community environmental enforcement, and constitutional environmental law. She graduated from Stanford University in 1994 with a major in Human Biology, received her JD in 2001 from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and received an LL.M. from the Georgetown University Law Center in 2004, where she litigated domestic environmental cases for two years with the Institute for Public Representation. Prior to law school, Lisa spent three years working on natural resource management as a Peace Corps volunteer in Niger. She has also worked on human rights and environmental issues with EarthRights International in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

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Liz Alden Wily

Liz Alden Wily (PhD, Political Economy) is a specialist in land tenure, working as an independent adviser to governments and aid agencies. She has over 30 years experience in Africa, Indonesia, Afghanistan, and Nepal. Dr. Wily works as researcher, practitioner, and policy adviser. She established the first minority rights programme in Botswana in the 1970s, played a role in mobilizing community owned forest management in East Africa, and developed innovative community based land tenure strategies in Sudan, Liberia, Nepal, and Afghanistan. Dr. Wily's primary commitment is to the recognition of customary/indigenous property rights in agrarian economies. She has published over 70 articles and monographs and is currently working on "Who Owns Africa? Examination of Land Tenure through a Community Based Lens," to be published by Rights and Resources, a global coalition of natural resource management agencies of which she is an Honorary Fellow.

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Lorena Jaramillo Castro

Lorena Jaramillo Castro is an Economic Affairs Officer of the Biodiversity and Climate Change Section at the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). Since 2001, she has been involved with the sustainable trade and sourcing of biodiversity-based products initially working in the BioTrade Initiative/UNCTAD HQ in Geneva and later as the Director of the BioTrade Programme in Ecuador. She has also worked at the Climate Change Training Programme (CC:Train) of the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and conducted trainings in Africa and Asia. She has written several articles and papers related to sustainable development, biodiversity and trade, and is currently developing an on-line course on BioTrade and Value Chain development with several universities in Latin America. Ms. Jaramillo is an Economist, specialized in Sustainable Development, of the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador and holds an MBA (Master of Business Administration) from the HEC – Geneva University, Switzerland.

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Louise Wrist Sorensen

Louise Wrist Sorensen is a Task Manager in the UNDP - UNEP Poverty & Environment Initiative African Team based in Nairobi. She has a Master’s Degree in International Development Studies and Geography from Roskilde University Centre, Denmark. Presently she is working on mainstreaming environment in national development policies and district level planning processes in low income countries, providing technical advice/design and supervision of programmes. Specifically, she is engaged in Mozambique and Rwanda. For more details on the PEI, please see http://www.unpei.org/.

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Louise Yeung

Louise Yeung is a planner at the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, where she focuses on improving urban ecosystems and infrastructure to build sustainable and equitable communities. Strengthening channels for public engagement in decision-making processes is a continuous theme in her work. Prior to becoming a planner, she served as a Research Associate at the Environmental Law Institute and the executive leader of SustainUS, a national youth-led organization that empowers young people to engage in environmental policymaking. Louise holds a Master's in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a B.A. in International Affairs from George Washington University.

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Lucile Gingembre

Lucile Gingembre has been working as Associate Programme Officer for UNEP Post Conflict and Disasters Management Branch (PCDMB) since February 2009. As such, she participated to the design, planning and implementation of the UNEP Haiti Country Programme, aiming to reduce poverty, disaster vulnerability and environmental degradation in the country. To undertake the lessons learnt study of environmental projects in Haiti, she made more than 40 interviews with organizational focal points and inspected numerous project sites. Prior to joining UNEP, she worked as Area Manager for a UNDP Local Development Programme (ART International Initiative) in a province of Northern Uruguay. Her field experience also includes several years of volunteering for an NGO in Morocco aiming to enhance education conditions for children and create income-generating activities for women. Lucile studied in France, Spain and China and holds a Masters Degrees in International Relations/Development from Sciences Po Paris and a Masters Degrees in International Law from Paris II University."

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Luisz Olmedo Martínez

Luisz Olmedo Martínez earned his MSc in Environment and Development. He has more than 14 years experience working with the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) in Colombia as Program Official and Advisor on indigenous issues. Luisz served as a UN delegate at the tables for dialogue and coordination between indigenous people and the Government, during 2005-2009. Luisz is a professor at the National University and Jorge Tadeo Lozano University and coordinator of a research group at the Colombia's National University.

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Luke A. Patey

Luke A. Patey is a PhD Fellow at the Copenhagen Business School and Danish Institute for International Studies. He is also the project manager of a multi-year initiative of the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Sudan, the Paths to Peace Research Network. His research examines the operations of international companies, particularly Asian National Oil Companies, in conflict-affected countries of the developing world. He has written several articles on the oil sector in Sudan, including "Against the Asian Tide: The Sudan Divestment Campaign". Journal of Modern African Studies. Vol. 47, No. 4, 2009, "State Rules: Oil Companies and Armed Conflict in Sudan". Third World Quarterly, Vol. 28, No. 5, 2007 and "A Complex Reality: The Strategic Behaviour of Multinational Oil Corporations and the New Wars in Sudan," DIIS Report No. 2, 2006.

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M. Y. Safar

M. Y. Safar is an Afghan Topographical/Cadastral Surveyor and Land Tenure Specialist and member of Terra Institute. He has more than 40 years professional experience in land surveying, land classification, land clarification, land registration and land administration. He is the former deputy of Afghan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO) and Director of Cadastral Department. Safar has worked in different UN and International agencies (UNICEF, UN-HABITAT, USAID, World Bank, Asian Development Bank and UK-Children in Crisis) in Afghanistan on health, water and sanitation, Information Education and Communication (IEC) Officer, CiC Project/ Office Manager, UN-HABITAT Program Officer, System Analyst / Procedural Documentation Consultant, USAID/OTI – RONCO, Kabul, USAID/OTI- Bearing Point, Program Director, Property Right, UN-HABITAT, Kabul, based in Ministry of Urban Development and Housing (MUDH). Management Consultant, Team Leader, Cadastre/ Mapping, USAID/EMG – LTERA, Kabul, Land Administration - Titling Specialist, Scanagri/Terra Institute Funded by ADB – DFID, Afghan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU) consultant, Funded by World Bank, Land tenure program manager, Kabul Urban Reconstruction Project (KURP)/World Bank and Consultant, SFL-OFDA/USAID. His undergraduate studies were completed at Kandahar National Cadastral Survey Vocational School (Diploma 1965), TTTA at Survey of India Hyderabad Survey Training Instititute (Certificate 1974 certified by Kabul University). Remote Sensing for Land Use Mapping and Planning, Gadja Madha University, Indonesia. (Certificate 1990).

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Manami Sekiguchi

Manami Sekiguchi is a graduate student of the Department of International Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences at the University of Tokyo. Her interest lies in rural development in Cambodia, particularly in the establishment of farmers’ organizations such as agricultural cooperatives and water users’ associations. She has also researched on land resource management in Cambodia, especially on how the dysfunction of a land ownership system would affect land conflicts among people.

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Mara Tignino

Mara Tignino is a senior researcher and lecturer at the University of Geneva School of Law. She is also a visiting scholar at the George Washington University School of Law and the Elliott School of International Affairs. Dr. Tignino served as a consultant to the United Nations Environment Programme and was a member of the legal team for Argentina in the Pulp Mills on the river Uruguay case before the International Court of Justice. She has written articles on public participation, peaceful settlement of water disputes, the protection of water during armed conflict, and privatization of water services. She is also the author of the book L'eau et la guerre: éléments pour un régime juridique with Bruyant (Brussels, 2011). Dr. Tignino received a BA in Political Science from the Libera Università Internazionale degli Studi Sociali in Rome, and a PhD. and D.E.A. in International Law from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva.

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Marcia A. Dawes

Marcia A. Dawes is an international lawyer with extensive experience in the United Nations and the private sector in peace mediation and the development and financing of natural resources projects. Ms. Dawes's research and policy work over the past 15 years has dealt with the design, planning and management of pre-negotiation, negotiation, and implementation frameworks, including drafting peace agreements ending intra-state conflicts, as well as providing technical legal and constitutional assistance on wealthsharing and natural resources issues to post-conflict countries and designing and implementing technical assistance to mediation processes. Ms Dawes has experience in countries such as Iraq, Sudan (North-South and Darfur), Iraq, Peru, Ecuador, Madagascar, Honduras, Cyprus, Guatemala, Liberia and Mozambique. She has authored and co-authored publications on peace agreement and wealthsharing issues. She holds a law degree from the Catholic University of Chile Law School, a master of laws (LL.M) from Harvard Law School and a master in international affairs from Columbia University's School of Public and International Affairs.

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Margie Buchanan-Smith

Margie Buchanan-Smith is an independent consultant and policy researcher. She has worked in the humanitarian aid sector for over 20 years, in senior management positions as well as doing policy analysis and research. Margie has held research fellowships at the Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex, and at the Overseas Development Institute where she was Coordinator of the Humanitarian Policy Group. She was also head of the Emergencies Unit at ActionAid for three years. She has published widely, on institutional and policy-related aspects of humanitarianism, and on Sudan (as well as other African countries). Her work in Sudan began in the 1980s when she worked with the Darfur Regional Government for two years between 1987 and 1989, as Agricultural Economics Adviser to the Agricultural Planning Unit. During this time, she initiated and designed a drought early warning system for North Darfur and carried out a study of the grain market throughout the region. Since the conflict began in Darfur in the early 2000s, Margie has carried out a number of advisory and evaluation assignments for different agencies, including UN agencies and international NGOs. In 2006, she led a WFP livelihoods study (Conflict, Camps and Coercion: The Continuing Livelihoods Crisis in Darfur); in 2007, she co-facilitated with Tufts University a series of workshops in Darfur on livelihoods programming, and also carried out a study on trade and markets in Darfur (Adaptation and Devastation: the Impact of the Conflict on Trade and Markets in Darfur); in 2008, she led a team for UNEP, investigating how the conflict has impacted on the trade in timber and wood fuel and impacts on Darfur‘s forest resources (forthcoming). A number of her publications are focused on Darfur. In 1995, she co-authored a book on Famine Early Warning and Response—the Missing Link. In the mid-1990s, she was Head of the Emergencies Unit at ActionAid.

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María del Pilar Ramirez Gröbli

María del Pilar Ramírez Gröbli has completed her PhD Studies in September 2014 in the Doctoral Program “Organization und Culture” at the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland. FromJanuary 2010 to 2014 she worked as Department Assistant and as a Teacher Fellow at the Department of Spanish Language and Literature at the same University. In 2007, she graduated as Lic. Phil I in Spanish and Political Science at the University of Zürich. In 1999, Mrs. Ramírez holds a Master in International Relations at the Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, and in 1994 she completed a Licentiate Degree in Spanish and English Literature at the Universidad Pedagógica Nacional, Bogotá, Colombia. Her doctoral project deals with culture and conflict; she analyses conflict transformation processes and researches the narrative and musical production composed by Colombian rural communities that were uprooted from their territories as a result of large-scale palm oil plantations.

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Maria Zita Butardo-Toribio

Maria Zita Butardo-Toribio is a candidate for PhD in Environmental Science at the University of the Philippines-Los Baños where she also earned her Master's degree in Environmental Science, minor in Resource Economics. She has more than 20 years of professional experience in diverse multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary environment and natural resources research, and development projects involving the upland, forest, coastal and urban ecosystems. She currently serves as Senior Policy Specialist of the USAID-funded Philippine Environmental Governance Project Phase 2.

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Marija Filipović

Marija Filipovic graduated from Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs, with an MPA in Environmental Science and Policy. Currently, she lives in New York City and works as an independent climate change and sustainability consultant, specializing in water management and climate change adaptation strategies. Her past experiences include provision of the climate change adaptation portfolio for the Gateway National Recreation Area in New York and New Jersey, U.S.

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Marina Vardanyan

Marina Vardanyan is currently the Team Leader for Water and Energy Portfolio for USAID/Armenia and Mission Environmental Officer. She also assists the European Commission (5, 6, 7 Research Framework) as an independent expert in evaluating projects in the fields of Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES), water management, biodiversity, and environmental management. Dr. Vardanyan's previous academic experience includes being a Visiting Lecturer in environmental economics at the American University of Armenia, and an Associate Professor in environmental economics at the Yerevan State Institute of Economics and ecology in Yerevan State University. Her recent publications include "Towards Integrated Water Resources Management in Armenia," "MIS Systems in Armenian Water Resources Management: A Case Study," and "Recent Improvements in Armenian Water Governance." Dr. Vardanyan obtained a Master of Science in Biophysics from Yerevan State University, and a PhD. from the Institute of Acrochemical Problems and Hydroponics of the NASRA.

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Mark B. Taylor

Mark B. Taylor is the Deputy Managing Director of the Fafo Institute for Applied International Studies, Oslo. In addition, he is also a Senior Advisor to Global Witness, a contributing editor of the 'Red Flags' initiative on liability risk for companies, and a contributing commentator for Al Jazeera English television and DOX, the European documentary film magazine. A former Managing Director of Fafo AIS, Mark has worked on such issues as international law and the regulation of business entities, the sociology of armed groups, the reform of UN peace operations and institutional protections for human rights. Mark holds a B.A. in Religion from McGill University, in Montreal, an LL.M in Public International Law from Leiden University, The Netherlands. Recent publications include articles on corporate accountability and trans-national law, the regulation of war economies and the politics of the Middle East.

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Marta R. Vigevano

Marta R. Vigevano is a Professor of International Law and International Humanitarian Law in the School of Law at the University of Buenos Aires. Professor Vigevano has a Master’s degree in Defence from the Ministry of Defense’s School of Defense. Vigevano has a Specialization in International Armed Conflicts Law and International Humanitarian Law, focusing on the legal restraints on violence in armed conflict from the National Institute Aeronautical Space of the Argentine Air Force. Professor Vigevano is a researcher as well, and is part of the investigating projects at the University of Buenos Aires about environmental synergies between continental waters and sea waters from customary law to substantive law (focusing on South America and the MERCOSUR) and about the adverse consequences on the environment and hydrological resources derived from the armed conflict in Colombia. Currently, Vigevano is the Academic Secretary of National Defense School of the Ministry of Defense.

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Martin E. Sandbu

Martin E. Sandbu is an editorial writer for the Financial Times and a Senior Fellow at the Zicklin Center for Business Ethics Research, the Wharton School. He received his B.A. in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics from Oxford University and his Ph.D. in Political Economy and Government from Harvard University. Dr. Sandbu writes for academic and non-academic publications on topics in economic theory, economic policy, political economy, international development, and moral and political philosophy. He has held academic positions at Columbia University and the Wharton School.

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Matthew Pritchard

Matthew Pritchard is a Master's student currently working on his thesis under Dr. Jon Unruh in the Department of Geography, at McGill University. His research examines the relationship between formal and informal property systems within the socially and legally pluralistic environments of post-conflict contexts. His thesis focuses specifically on the evolution of informal land tenure systems in post-genocide Rwanda. Matthew's general research interests include: land reform, legal pluralism, post-conflict development, political ecology, food security, peace studies & agricultural development. He combines his current work with academic experiences in the US and UK, and fieldwork in Rwanda, Burundi and Tanzania.

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Matthew S. Winters

Matthew S. Winters is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research focuses on foreign aid and development. Dr. Winters has published articles in World Politics, the Annual Review of Political Science, International Studies Review, and Business and Politics. He is currently working on a book manuscript about corruption in World Bank projects. Dr. Winters holds a Ph.D. from Columbia University, where he was a part of the NSF-funded IGERT Program in International Development and Globalization. Before starting at the University of Illinois, he was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance at Princeton University.

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Matthew Wilburn King

Matthew Wilburn King earned his PhD at the University of Cambridge, England where he developed an innovative approach to environmental conflict analysis. He is an American political geographer focused on the geo-politics of resource scarcity and environmental change. He carries out research, consulting, and writing for NGOs, think tanks, policy institutions, governments, and universities interested in the role of alternative environmental governance architectures in peacebuilding. He is especially interested in mapping commodity-related conflicts around the world in order to compare the nature of, sources of, and impacts of conflicts related to practices in forestry, fisheries, agriculture, mining, and energy sectors and the role of alternative governance architectures in addressing impacts. Upon completing a Master’s degree in International Conflict Studies at Trinity College, Dublin, Matthew served as a US Presidential Management Fellow under the Clinton Administration. His tenure with government began in the US Department of Interior. He then served as the Senior Program Manager for Latin America and the Caribbean with the Office of International Activities for NOAA Research. He left government service in 2007 and founded the Living GREEN Foundation Global Research Expeditions Education Network and now serves as the President and Chairman of the Board.

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Matti Lehtonen

Matti Lehtonen is a Programme Officer dealing with post-conflict issues in the UNEP New York Office. His duties include work on the conflict linkages of natural resources and the environment, improving relevant UN system guidance and tools, as well as country-specific assessments. Prior to this, he worked as a Policy Officer in the UN Peacebuilding Support Office (PBSO) serving as the natural resources specialist. In this function, he focused on good practices in environmental security and peacebuilding as well as policy advice with a view to mainstreaming environmentally related concerns into peacebuilding strategies and plans. Previously Matti has worked in the Balkans, assessing the political situation and stability in the framework of the EU Common Foreign and Security Policy missions. During 2005-2007, he was the Head of EU Monitoring Mission's Mission Office in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Other assignments have included two years in the European Commission's Delegation to Venezuela, work in the waste management sector of the Baltic states, and the Council of Europe as well as the Council of Europe's Bank.

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Mauricio Castro Salazar

Mauricio Castro-Salazar is a Central American, who was born in Costa Rica and grew up in Guanacaste (Northwestern Region). He has worked in all Central American countries and was Executive Secretary of the Central American Commission on Environment and Development, who gathers the 7 ministries of environment of Central American countries. He also was Costa Rica's President Envoy for Sustainable Development, leading the signature of the Presidentials commitment given in the Central American Alliance for Sustainable Development. He has published many articles related with sustainable development, natural resources management and writes a weekly newspaper column dedicated to comment environmental aspects. He is a civil engineer, with a Master in Science and nowadays is the Client Service Senior Manager for Ecosecurities, carbon market leader, and Director of Fundecooperacion para el Desarrollo Sostenible.

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Mehdi Mirzaee

Dr. Mehdi Mirzaee has a B.Eng. and M.Eng in Civil Engineering, water resources and a PhD in Hydrology and water resources. He is Assistant professor, School of Civil Engineering in the Islamic Azad University (Central Tehran Branch), Iran and courtesy faculty of Geosciences department, Oregon State University, USA. He is a water resources management and policy expert and has worked in many national water resources projects since 1994. He published the first Iranian book on IWRM in 2007 and tried to define and apply this approach for water development projects in Iran. He is interested and has studied on IWRM, water policy and management, transboundary watershed and/or conflict resolution, particularly in the Middle East. Although Mehdi's major is Civil Engineering, but he is interesting on interaction of development and socio-political issues.

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Melanne A. Civic

Melanne Andromecca Civic is the Special Advisor to the Center for Complex Operations (CCO) at the National Defense University (NDU), seconded from the Secretary of State's Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization. She is an attorney with a legal and policy focus on international human rights and environmental law with respect to fragile states, serving in the U.S. Government for more than a decade, and with the UN and international NGOs. Civic is expert in rule of law and the nexus of climate change and national security. Previously, Ms. Civic served in the State Department's Office of the Legal Adviser for Human Rights & Refugees, and was a Fellow to the late Senator Kennedy on the Judiciary Committee. She was also the staff attorney to the Science and Technology Advisor to the Secretary of State, and a Fellow to the House Science Committee Ranking Member on energy security. Beyond U.S. Government service, Ms. Civic has worked for the World Bank Office of General Counsel, Environment and International Law Unit, and various UN Agencies and Offices, including the Commission on Sustainable Development. She has also served with international NGOs, including the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Human Rights, the Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund (AKA Earth Justice) and the Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL). Ms. Civic is the author of numerous law review and other scholarly articles, is the founder and Co-Chair of the American Society of International Law's Transitional Justice and Rule of Law Interest Group; a member of the Steering Committee for the American Bar Association's Women in International Law Committee; and an Editor of the American Bar Association Year in Review Journal. Ms. Civic has an LL.M. in International and Comparative Law from the Georgetown School of Law, was an Urban Morgan Fellow in Human Rights Law, and studied at the Rene Cassin Institute for Human Rights.

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Michael D. Beevers

Michael D. Beevers is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland and an affiliate with the Harrison Program on the Future Global Agenda. Michael’s interests are in the domains of environmental politics and international relations where he focuses broadly on the intersection of development and security, and how discourses of global governance reverberate at the local level. His dissertation research examines how environmental and natural resource governance influences and shapes outcomes in war-torn societies and is conducting related fieldwork in Sierra Leone and Liberia. Before attending the University of Maryland, he was as a Research Associate at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School in the Science, Technology and Environmental Policy Program where his work explored the impacts of climate change and sea level rise. Mr. Beevers has been a consultant for the World Resources Institute, and has worked in South Asia and West Africa on development and environment issues. Michael served in the Peace Corps (Niger) and also holds a MS and MPA from the University of Washington.

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Michael L. Ross

Michael L. Ross is a Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and Director of the Center for Southeast Asian Studies. He previously taught at the University of Michigan, and was a Visiting Scholar at the World Bank. He has served on advisory boards for the Revenue Watch Institute, the Bonn International Conversion Center, and the World Bank, and is a member of the Technical Group for the Natural Resource Charter. He has published widely on the political and economic problems of resource-rich countries, civil war, democratization, women's rights, and the politics of Southeast Asia. His article "Oil, Islam, and Women" received the 2009 Heinz Eulau Award from the American Political Science Association for the best article published in the American Political Science Review.

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Michael Painter

Michael Painter is part of the Global Challenges team at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), where leads the team addressing the Human Livelihoods and Conservation Global Challenge. Before assuming this position, he directed the WCS Amazon Program and country programs in Bolivia and Peru. An anthropologist by training, Dr. Painter received his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees from the University of Florida, and conducted his undergraduate studies at the University of Virginia. His research has focused on how social and economic processes shape patterns of land use, and he has conducted long-term research on the social causes of land degradation in Latin America. Dr. Painter's publications include an edited book titled The Social Causes of Environmental Destruction in Latin America (University of Michigan Press, 1995) and "Biodiversity Conservation and the Quality of Life of Indigenous People in the Bolivian Chaco" in Human Organization.

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Michael Renner

Michael Renner is a Senior Researcher at the Washington-DC based Worldwatch Institute. During the past two decades, his work has focused on the linkages between environment, resources, and conflict, post-disaster peacemaking, and employment and environment connections. Michael was co-director of the 2005 edition of State of the World (focused on Redefining Security). In 2007, he co-authored a report examining the opportunities for peacemaking in the wake of natural disasters in Sri Lanka, Aceh (Indonesia), and Kashmir. Before joining Worldwatch in 1987, Michael was a Corliss Lamont Fellow in Economic Conversion at Columbia University (1986-87) and a research associate at the World Policy Institute in New York City (1984-86). He serves on the board of the Global Policy Forum (New York), is a Senior Advisor to the Institute for Environmental Security (The Hague/Brussels), and a member of the Advisory Group on Sustainable Security for the Oxford Research Group ( United Kingdom). Born and raised in Germany, Michael is a cum laude graduate of the University of Amsterdam, where he received a Master's degree in international relations.

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Mike Davis

Mike Davis works with Global Witness, an NGO which investigates the links between natural resource exploitation and armed conflict and corruption. He heads Global Witness's Conflict Resources Team, whose main areas of focus currently include conflict minerals in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, blood diamonds in Zimbabwe, oil in Sudan, and natural resource governance in Liberia. Between 2005 and 2007 he led Global Witness's work on corruption, organised crime, and environmental degradation in the timber trade in Cambodia and Burma. Mr. Davis managed Global Witness's office in Cambodia from 2003 up until the organisation's expulsion in 2005.

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Mikiko Sugiura

Mikiko Sugiura is Assistant Professor of the Department of Biological and Environment Engineering, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences at the University of Tokyo. Dr. Sugiura’s field-based research focuses on Water Resources Management, especially on how to manage “water scarcity and conflict” when people have too little water during an abnormal dry period or suffer from too much water during floods. She has also contributed to agricultural public reports as an author, and participated in OECD Expert Meeting of water pricing as an expert. She holds a PhD and Master’s degree (both in International Relations), and BA (in Law) from the University of Tokyo.

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Mikiyasu Nakayama

Mikiyasu Nakayama is Head and Professor of the Department of International Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences at the University of Tokyo. Professor Nakayama’s research subjects include: application of satellite remote sensing data for environmental monitoring of lake basin; use of Geographical Information System (GIS) for environmental management of river and lake basins; environmental impact assessment methodologies applicable for involuntary resettlement due to dam construction; and involvement of international organizations in management of international water bodies. He holds a PhD, MSc, and BA (all in Agricultural Engineering) from the University of Tokyo.

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Miko Maekawa

Miko Maekawa holds an MSc in Environment and Development from the University of East Anglia, UK. She is a staff member of United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). She has worked in the UNDP — China office as Programme Officer (2000-2003), Bureau of Management of UNDP HQ as Planning Specialist (2003-2005), and UNDP Rwanda office as Assistant Resident Representative heading the Environment unit (2005-2007). During her assignment in Rwanda, she served as the Co-chair of Environment and Land Use Management Sub-sector Working Group supporting the Government Chair to formulate Rwanda’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP).

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Mishkat Al Moumin

Mishkat Al Moumin is the Former Minister of the Environment in the Interim Iraqi Government and Environmental Law Institute. Dr. Al Moumin is a well-known Iraqi lawyer, and an assistant professor of human rights in University of Baghdad - School of Law. Since Iraq did not previously have a ministry of the environment, Dr. Al Moumin designed its entire structure. In this post, she also developed new environmental law, led campaigns to support Iraqi people living in environmentally dangerous areas, and initiated awareness and cleaning projects. In all these campaigns, Dr. Al Moumin engaged community based NGOs and community leaders. Most notably the Ministry — during her time — has issued the first report in the modern Iraqi history about the environmental status in Iraq.

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Mourad Shalaby

Mourad Shalaby is a graduate student in the Geography Masters program at McGill University, where he is investigating the relationship between climate change, development, and adaptation in the Congo forest region. He has a Bachelor`s degree in Human Environmental Geography from the University of Montreal, where he conducted studies on urban issues in Third World countries, GIS and Cartography, field assessments of land management, Environmental Impact Assessments, and Natural Resources management. His additional work includes the analysis of air pollution in Cairo, the history of transport policy and planning in the city of Montreal, and the evaluation of the quality of life in Montreal. Mr. Shalaby also has a certificate in Trade, Development & the Environment from the London School of Economics, where he conducted research on the issue of climate change and the role of the United States.

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Munqeth Mehyar

Munqeth Mehyar serves as the Jordanian Director of Friends of the Earth Middle East. As Jordanian Director, Mr. Mehyar leads FoEME activities concerning the Jordan River, Dead Sea and the Good Water Neighbors program. As Chairman, his responsibilities include the supervision of international project development and management, liaison and lobbying of governmental and private sector figures on major regional policy issues relevant to environmental protection and development of international contacts and functional partnerships with international environmental and development institutions. Mr. Mehyar has organized dozens of regional conferences, workshops and study tours, has supervised regional research on shared ecosystems, co-authored reports and policy papers and speaks regularly on water, peace and security issues. Mr. Mehyar received a degree in Regional Planning and Architecture from the University of Louisiana, USA in 1981, upon which he became the planning engineer for South Amman. He serves on the Board of Directors of both the Jor dan Sports Federation for the Handicapped, and the Jor dan Royal Ecological Diving Society. Recently, Mr. Mehyar was awarded a medal from Al Houssain Distinguished Giving for his charitable activities. Mr. Mehyar is married with 4 children, and resides in Amman, Jor dan. FoEME's three co-Directors were honored by TIME Magazine as Environmental Heroes of 2008 and were granted the prestigious Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship in 2009.

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Munther Haddadin

A graduate of the University of Washington in Seattle with a Ph.D degree in Civil Engineering in 1969, Dr. Munther Haddadin served as Minister of Water and Irrigation in the Jordan Cabinet (1997-1998), a senior negotiator in Jordan's delegations to the Middle East Peace Process in charge of water, energy and the environment (1991-1995), a Courtesy Professor at Oregon State University since 2001, at University of Oklahoma since 2003, and at the University of Central Florida since 2007. Dr. Haddadin is currently a consultant and worked out of Anman, Jordan.

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Murray Burt

Murray Burt is the Global Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Programme Manager for Tearfund UK. He has extensive field experience working within commercial engineering consultancies and non governmental organisations in Asia, Africa, and New Zealand, particularly in the area of water and environmental management, and his work primarily focuses on the conflict and post-conflict zones of Africa and Asia. One of his projects received the Arthur Mead Award from the Institute of Professional Engineers New Zealand for promoting environmental sustainability principles. Mr. Burt is the author of several papers focused on water and environmental management, and recently presented a paper at World Water Week in Stockholm entitled "Strengthening Community Management of Water Schemes in the Post Conflict Context of Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo." He is a Chartered Civil Engineer in the United Kingdom and New Zealand and holds a degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Auckland, New Zealand.

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Nader Al Khateeb

Nader Khateeb is the Palestinian Director of Friends of the Earth Middle East (FoEME). Mr. Al-Khateeb served as Chief Engineer for the Bethlehem, Beit Jala and Beit Sahour Water Authority from 1984 to 1993, where he was responsible for planning and fundraising, as well as operations and maintenance of the distribution network. After returning from leave to acquire his M.Sc. degree, he also became the Project Manager for their drainage and sewerage project. From 1994 to 1997, Mr. Al-Khateeb was a senior water resource engineer with the UNDP's Water Resources Action Program, working as a consultant in the effort to formulate and establish the Palestinian Water Authority (PWA). He then became associated with the PWA itself, coordinating a host of water and wastewater projects. In 1998, he joined the newly established Water and Environmental Development Organization (WEDO). During this time he also served as a consultant to various international development organizations working in the water sector. He carried out feasibility studies for the industrial waste management sector in Hebron under USAID, worked with UNESCO to prepare a conceptual Emergency Master Plan for the Bethlehem Region and trained municipal engineers in the Gaza Strip on wastewater collection and treatment systems along with the German group Carl Duisberg Gesellschaft (CDG). In 2001, WEDO became the base for the Palestinian branch of Friends of the Earth Middle East (FoEME) and Mr. Al-Khateeb has since served as its Director. Mr. Al-Khateeb is a registered Professional Engineer in the West Bank and a registered Professional Engineer in Amman, Jordan, in the Division of Mining Engineering, Section of Geological Engineering. FoEME's three co-Directors were honored by TIME Magazine as Environmental Heroes of 2008 and were granted the prestigious Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship in 2009.

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Nao Shimoyachi-Yuzawa

Nao Shimoyachi-Yuzawa is a research fellow with The Japan Institute of International Affairs. Prior to joining JIIA in 2006, she served as a program officer at the Foundation for International Development/Relief, where she was responsible for a medical project in Cambodia. Prior to that, she was a staff writer for The Japan Times, covering national security, politics, and social issues. She received her LLB from the University of Tokyo and her MA in Peace Studies from the University of Bradford, UK.

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Naomi Hatsukano

Naomi Hatsukano is a research fellow at IDE-JETRO (Institute of Developing Economies, Japan). She is conducting research activities in Cambodia as a visiting researcher at Royal University of Law and Economics, Cambodia, May 2007-May 2009. Her current research covers land law and policy in Cambodia, and focuses on the development and implementation of land law and policy since the 1990s. She holds an M.A. in International Studies and a B.A.in Law from the University of Tokyo.

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Naori Miyazawa

Naori Miyazawa worked as the head of office with United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) in Tokyo from 2004 to 2008. From 2001 to 2005 in East Timor, she worked with various institutions, including international NGOs, managing a post-conflict reconstruction and recovery, development and environmental projects. Experiences in East Timor include lectureship at the national university in the field of environmental studies. Prior to the tenure in East Timor, with the Environment and Sustainable Development Programme of the United Nations University, she researched environmental governance issues in East Asia, published in several articles. She is a Ph.D. Candidate in International Studies, University of Tokyo, and obtained her Master’s degree in Environment and Development from the University of London.

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Neda Zawahri

Neda Zawahri (Ph.D. University of Virginia) is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Cleveland State University. Her research interest includes an examination of the management of international river disputes, the role of international institutions in facilitating cooperation, environmental security, and the potential for conflict and cooperation between adversaries. Professor Zawahri’s research focuses on the Middle East and South Asia, where she has conducted extensive field research in India, Israel, Jordan, Syria, and Turkey. She has published widely on the management of the Indus, Euphrates, Tigris, and Yarmouk Rivers.

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Nesreen Barwari

Nesreen Barwari is a citizen of Iraq and resident of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. She is the former Minister of Municipalities & Public Works, Government of Iraq (2003-2006), Baghdad, and the former Minister of Reconstruction & Development, Kurdistan Regional Government, Erbil, Kurdistan-Iraq (1999-2003). Ms. Barwari has worked with different UN agencies (UN-Habitat, UNHCR, UNIRCU, UNOCHI) on various program and management positions from 1991 to 1998. Her undergraduate studies were completed at Baghdad University in architectural engineering and urban planning (BSc 1991), and graduate studies at the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government in public policy and management (MPA 1999). Ms. Barwari completed two years in a PhD program at the University of British Columbia School of Community and Regional Planning. Her research interest is: “Rethinking decentralization as the pathway to democratic governance: How decentralization and governance shape local planning practices — lessons from the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.” Her professional career has been a seamless series of sought challenges to improve the human condition, with full spectrum involvement from local environments to senior levels of responsibility at regional and national levels. With interest and sensitivity regarding the effects of policy development at the people level, with roots and work experience in the mountains of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she empathizes public policy development (formulation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation), improving governance and governing performance, raising ethical standards, and promoting integrity, requiring sensitive and effective leadership and management.

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Nicholas Garrett

Nicholas Garrett is a Mining Consultant specialising in conflict and post-conflict minerals management and corporate social responsibility in high-risk environments. Nicholas has worked with multilateral institutions, the British and German governments, the private sector, NGOs and multi-stakeholder initiatives, such as the EITI, to improve the developmental impact of natural resource sectors. He has undertaken extensive field research in DR Congo, Rwanda and Angola. Nicholas is enrolled as a Heinrich-Böll-Foundation funded PhD Candidate at the Freie Universität Berlin, where he writes under supervision of Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative Chairman and Transparency International Founder Prof. Dr. Peter Eigen on how to channel the DR Congo’s natural resource wealth into sustainable development processes.

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Njeri Karuru

Njeri Karuru currently works with the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) as a Senior Program Officer, East and Southern Africa, for the Peace, Conflict and Development Program Initiative. Ms. Karuru monitors, manages and evaluates research projects dealing with conflict and governance issues in the 24 countries in the Eastern and Southern Africa region. She came to IDRC from the USAID Regional Conflict Management and Governance Office for East and Southern Africa based in Nairobi where she worked as a Senior Conflict Management and Governance Advisor. Before joining USAID, she worked on a number of different aspects of CPMR and related topics. Ms. Karuru carried out consultancies in training and research in conflict management for several UN agencies, Bilateral organizations and NGOs such as UNDESA, UN Staff College, DFID and International Alert, among others. She has served as an editor at the Institute of African Studies, University of Nairobi, as National Coordinator with Women and Law in East Africa and as an Associate Director with the Center for Conflict Research. Njeri has a B.A (Political Science/Sociology), M.A in Anthropology and a postgraduate diploma in Journalism from the University of Nairobi, and a postgraduate diploma in Women’s Law from the University of Zimbabwe.

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Oliver Agoncillo

Oliver Agoncillo has masters degrees in environmental management and development, and social development from the Australian National University and the Ateneo de Manila University, respectively through scholarship and fellowship awards from the Australian government and the Ford Foundation. His development expertise include program development, management and evaluation; participatory research; policy advocacy; civil society-community development; and natural resources management. Currently he is Team Leader of USAID/Philippines' Natural Resources and Biodiversity Program, which focuses on improving governance of coastal-marine and forest resources.

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Owen Williams

Owen Williams is a program associate at the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) with the Humanitarian Partnerships (HP) program. The HP works to include environmental issues in the humanitarian sector, especially in recovery and reconstruction activities following natural and man-made disasters for the dual goal of greater human welfare and healthy ecosystems. Previously, Mr. Williams worked for the International Rescue Committee providing resettlement services to refugee and asylee families from around the world. He holds a Masters degree from American University in International Environmental Policy and is a contributing author for the forthcoming Green Recovery and Reconstruction Toolkit (GRRT) created by WWF. The GRRT is a content paper and trainer's guide for humanitarian professionals to build capacity for consideration of environmental issues in recovery and reconstruction work.

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P.B. Anand

Dr. P.B. Anand is a reader in environmental economics and public policy at the University of Bradford. His research focuses on sustainable human development in natural resource rich societies; on issues related to capabilities and human rights in the context of water governance; and examining the role of participatory and citizen centred mechanisms to promote accountability. He has written on resolution of river water conflicts, MDGs and trans-boundary mechanisms for co-operation in infrastructure planning.

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Päivi Lujala

Päivi Lujala is an Associate Professor in the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Department of Geography, a post doctoral fellow in NTNU's Department of Economics, and a Senior Researcher at the Centre for the Study of Civil War at the Peace Research Institute in Oslo, Norway (CSCW/PRIO). She has a BSc in Geography from the University of Helsinki, Finland, an MSc in Economics from Helsinki School of Economics, and a PhD in Economics from NTNU. Her research interests primarily focus on natural resources' impact on armed civil conflict. Dr. Lujala is the author of several articles that examine the role of diamonds, other gemstones, oil, gas, and drug cultivation in initiating, intensifying and prolonging conflict. At CSCW she participates in a project that studies natural resource management in post-conflict societies and a working group that looks at environmental factors, including natural resources, related to conflict. She has served as a member of the editorial committee for the Journal of Peace Research.

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Paul Collier

Paul Collier, CBE is a Professor of Economics and Director for the Centre for the Study of African Economies at the University of Oxford. From 1998-2003 he was the director of the Development Research Group of the World Bank. He is the author of three books; "The Bottom Billion: Why the Poorest Countries are Failing and What Can Be Done About It", published in 2007; "Wars, Guns and Votes: Democracy in Dangerous Places", published in March 2009; and his most recent book, entitled "The Plundered Planet: How to reconcile prosperity with nature", which was published in May of 2010. His research covers the causes and consequences of civil war; the effects of aid and the problems of democracy in low-income and natural-resources rich societies.

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Paula Defensor Knack

Paula Defensor Knack is among the Philippines' leading experts on land management and policy. She has held the highest office in the lands sector in the Philippines as former Assistant Secretary for Lands and Legislative Affairs of the Philippine Department of Environment and Natural Resources and has headed United Nations technical secretariats and working groups on the environment and natural resources sector. After leaving government, she held the position of Head of National Policy Studies and Legal Specialist of the AusAid-World Bank Land Administration Management Program. Other positions she has held include: Chair of the Panel of Experts on Toxic and Hazardous Wastes in Former U.S. Military bases under the Office of the President, Chair of the National Gender and Development Focal Point System, Head of the Legislative Liaison Systems under the Office of the President, Advisor to the Speaker of the House of Representatives, and Deputy Chief of Staff at the Senate, among others. Ms. Knack graduated with bachelors degrees in social sciences and law from the University of the Philippines, as well as a master of science degree in sustainable resource management (Concentrations: Landscape Planning and Renewable Resources) from the Technical University of Munich. She is trained in landscape planning, remote sensing, and geographical information systems in Germany and the United States. She served as Legal and Scientific Advisor to the Philippine Permanent Representation to the Organization for Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) at The Hague, Netherlands, before proceeding to her master's degree in public international law.

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Peter Van der Auweraert

Peter Van der Auweraert works as Senior Advisor on Post-Conflict Land and Property Issues and Transitional Justice at the International Organization for Migration (IOM). Currently, he is engaged in a United Nations sponsored peace mediation effort on land and property issues in Kirkuk, Iraq. Prior to his current post, Peter Van der Auweraert was Executive Director of Avocats Sans Fronti̬res, an international NGO working on access to justice issues in post-conflict and transitional countries in Africa, the Middle East and South-East Asia. From 1999-2006, he also held a Visiting Lectureship in International Criminal and Public Law at the University of Turku in Finland. Peter Van der Auweraert earned an LLM in International Law from the University of London (United Kingdom) and a first degree in law from the University of Antwerp (Belgium). He has published on transitional justice and post-conflict land and property issues in English, French, Spanish and Dutch.

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Peter Zahler

Peter Zahler is the Deputy Director of the Asia Program at the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). Zahler has over 25 years of experience in conservation biology with over 40 journal publications, and he has performed research, consulted, or managed programs in such locations as Afghanistan, Alaska, Iran, Peru, and Venezuela. He ran the WCS Pakistan Program from 1996 until 2001. In 2002 he coordinated and led the UNEP Post-Conflict Environmental Assessment of Afghanistan, supervising 5 field teams covering over 70 sites across the country and looking at subjects ranging from urban pollution to protected area management to ministerial capacity. In 2003 he helped design and implement the WCS Mongolia Country Program, and then designed and started the WCS Afghanistan Program beginning in 2006. As Deputy Director for WCS, Zahler now supervises programs and projects in China, Russia, Mongolia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Papua New Guinea.

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Philippe Le Billon

Philippe Le Billon is Associate Professor at the University of British Columbia with the Department of Geography and the Liu Institute for Global Issues. Before joining UBC, he was a Research Associate with the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) and the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS). Research interests focuses on the links between environment, development and security - with a focus on primary commodity sectors. He has published widely on the links between natural resources and armed conflicts, authored 'Fuelling War: Natural Resources and Armed Conflicts' (IISS/Routledge, 2005) and edited 'The Geopolitics of Resource Wars' (Cass, 2005).

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Rajendra Pradhan

Rajendra Pradhan, an anthropologist, is the Dean of Nep_ School of Social Sciences and Humanities. He received his PhD degree from the University of Delhi. He has conducted research on a wide range of topics, including religion among Hindu Newars of Kathmandu, food habits of Tarai inhabitants, and care of the elderly in a Dutch village. His research over the past decade and more has focused on using the legal anthropological perspective to study water and land rights in Nepal as well as looking at social and cultural diversity and its impact on social exclusion, access to political, social, economic resources and law. His most recent research interest is on studying Supreme Court cases pertaining to women's rights in Nepal. He is the founder member of Social Science Baha, a NGO dedicated to promoting social sciences in Nepal, of which he served as the Chair from January 2002 to April 2010. He has served as research consultant to various organisations, including the International Water Management Institute, the International Food Policy Research Institute, the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. He had conducted several research workshops and training sessions for Nepali and international participants on topics such as legal pluralism, ethnography and water rights. His publications include "Water Rights, Conflict and Policy," "Water, Land and Law: Changing Rights to Land and Water in Nepal," "Law, History and Culture of Water in Nepal," and "Legal Pluralism and Unofficial Law in Social, Economic and Political Development." He is currently editing a book with Ruth Meinzen-Dick and Ujjwal Pradhan titled, "Unpacking Water Rights: A Comparative Reader."

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Reinhold Gallmetzer

Reinhold Gallmetzer is currently employed as an Appeals Counsel with the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court. His previous positions include Legal Officer, Chambers, ICC; Associate Legal Officer, Chambers, ICTY; Judicial Training Officer, Kosovo Judicial Institute, OSCE; and Legal Consultant to the authorities in South Sudan and to the Criminal Defence Section of the State Court in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Mr. Gallmetzer is a co-founder and member of the Board of Directors of International Criminal Law Services, a non-profit organisation specialised in providing training and technical assistance to legal practitioners in domestic and hybrid criminal courts.

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Rhodri C. Williams

Mr. Rhodri Williams works as a consultant on human rights and forced migration issues. More recently, he drafted a manual on domestic implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, including chapters on humanitarian aid, documentation, property issues, employment, electoral rights and education. He is the author and co-author of numerous articles, including “Post-Conflict Property Restitution and Refugee Return in Bosnia and Herzegovina: Implications for International Standard-Setting and Practice,” in the New York University Journal of International Law and Politics (March 2006). Mr. Williams is currently a Research Fellow at the Åland Islands Peace Institute (Finland). He received his JD from New York University School of Law, his MA in Geography from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University, and his Bachelor’s degree from Macalester College.

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Richard Matthew

Richard A. Matthew (BA McGill; PhD Princeton) is Associate Professor of International and Environmental Politics in the Schools of Social Ecology and Social Science at the University of California at Irvine, and founding Director of the Center for Unconventional Security Affairs (www.cusa.uci.edu). His field-based research focuses on international relations in the developing world, especially South Asia and East Africa, and he has published widely on transnational security threats including climate change, infectious disease, terrorism and landmines. Dr. Matthew has worked closely with major U.S. corporations, the United Nations, numerous international non-profit organizations and a variety of U.S. government departments and agencies. In addition to his positions at UCI, he is also the Senior Fellow for Security at the International Institute for Sustainable Development in Geneva, a member of the United Nations Expert Advisory Group on Environment, Conflict and Peacebuilding, and a member of the World Conservation Union

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Richard Volk

Richard Volk joined the USAID Water Team in 1998 and provides technical and managerial support for a variety of watershed and coastal resources management activities. During his 30 years in natural resources management he has worked in more than 50 countries, providing technical assistance on numerous water and coastal resources management, fisheries, biodiversity conservation, and environmental planning programs and activities. Before joining the USAID Water Team, Richard was Executive Director of the Corpus Christi Bay National Estuary Program, a five-year scientific assessment and consensus-building effort to develop a comprehensive conservation and management plan for three of the seven major estuaries on the Texas coast. He now manages several coastal and aquatic resource management programs for USAID, and provides technical assistance to USAID Missions on the design and implementation of basin management and integrated coastal management initiatives worldwide. Richard holds a BS degree in Biology and an MPA in Development Assistance.

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Robert A. Reed

Robert (Bob) Reed is a public health engineer who has been working in emergency water supply and sanitation for over 30 years. For many years he has been a Senior Programme Manager at WEDC, Loughborough University, UK. His work in emergencies has included field operations in Africa and Asia; research to improve the technologies and management of emergency water supply and sanitation; and teaching at undergraduate, postgraduate and professional development levels. He recently initiated a new Masters programme entitled Engineering in Emergencies.

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Ross Wolfarth

Ross Wolfarth is a law student at Columbia University. He worked in 2008 as a research intern with the Environmental Law Institute focusing on post-conflict natural resource management issues. In 2008, he graduated from Amherst College with a B.A. in History.

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Roy Brooke

Roy Brooke currently leads a climate change adaptation initiative at the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in Geneva, Switzerland. He has worked at national and international levels in Canada, Europe, and Africa on diverse programme design and implementation, policy development, and advocacy challenges. His areas of focus have included climate change, the environment and development interface, corporate social responsibility, humanitarian affairs, environmental governance, and disaster risk reduction. Roy's career has included assignments with government, non-government, and international organizations. In Canada, he served as a senior political advisor to the Minister of Environment, providing strategy advice and leading a wide range of policy initiatives. He also led a new federal initiative on corporate social responsibility, developing innovative partnerships with the private sector, academia, and non-government organizations. In 2003, Roy moved to Switzerland. Following assignments with UNEP and the World Health Organization, he spent several years in the UN's humanitarian coordination organization, focusing on issues such as environmental emergency governance systems and capacity development. He then held the post of UNEP's Environment Programme Coordinator in Kigali, Rwanda, where he led UN efforts in the country to increase environmental sustainability. Roy was born in 1970 in Canada and holds a Masters from Cambridge University. He currently lives in Nyon, Switzerland with his wife Sara. He spends as much time as possible outdoors and is an avid hiker and snowboarder.

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Roy Maconachie

Roy Maconachie is Lecturer in International Development at the University of Bath. He is a human geographer by background. Before joining Bath, he held research positions at the University of Manchester and IDS, Sussex. His research focuses on the political economy of natural resource management, with a specific interest in the socio-economic dimensions of small-scale mining in West Africa. His recent work in Sierra Leone explores the increasing tension between artisanal mining and large-scale extraction, with a focus on how civil society groups are impacting the mining sector.

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Russ Doran

Russ Doran is the Head of the Policy Unit of the Engineering Section of the Logistics Support Division (LSD) at the United Nations Department of Field Support (UNDFS). He has a Master's Degree in Engineering Science from the University of New South Wales, Australia. He has previously headed LSD's Movement Control Unit and Air Transport Section during 16 years of peacekeeping experience. Prior to working for the United Nations he was an engineer officer in the Australian Army after graduating from the Royal Military College, Duntroon.

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Ruth Meinzen-Dick

Ruth Meinzen-Dick is a Senior Research Fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Washington, DC. She is Coordinator of the CGIAR System-wide Program on Collective Action and Property Rights (CAPRi), a research program and network involving 15 international centers and partners at over 400 other organizations, and President of the International Association for the Study of the Commons. She is a Development Sociologist who received her MSc and PhD degrees from Cornell University. Much of her work has been interdisciplinary research on water policy, local organizations, property rights, gender analysis, and the impact of agricultural research on poverty. She has conducted field work in Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Zimbabwe, Kenya, and India. She has published over 100 journal articles, book chapters, or books, including "Negotiating Water Rights" and "Innovation in natural resource management: The role of property rights and collective action in developing countries."

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Saba Nordström

Saba Nordström has more than ten years of experience working with environmental policy in the field in Africa, South East and Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia. She has worked for the UN Food and Agriculture Organization as well as with the UN Development Programme, and has implemented programmes and projects in different political contexts including Small Island Developing States, transition economies, and conflict and post-conflict situations. Ms. Nordström is a frequent contributor to publications issued by the Environment and Security Initiative, the Helsinki Convention, and more recently the International Atomic Energy Agency. She graduated from the University of Edinburgh with a BSc. in Biological Sciences and a MSc. in European and International Politics. Ms. Nordström is currently an Environmental Adviser to the Secretariat of the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, where much of her work focuses on Central Asia.

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Sadaf Lakhani

Sadaf Lakhani has over 10 years of experience in international development, and is currently working as an independent consultant based in Washington D.C. Ms. Lakhani's last assignment, with UNDP-BCPR, was a global review and policy reformulation of UNDP programmes in conflict and fragile states. She joined UNDP in 2006, managing post-conflict programmes in Aceh, Indonesia. Prior to UNDP she worked for the European Commission in Brussels, Indonesia and Timor Leste and Ghana and Togo on human rights, justice, security and governance programming. Ms. Lakhani started her professional life in policy advocacy for a European NGO network, lobbying the IFIs on debt, financing for development and poverty reduction strategies and later managing a regional programme in West Africa. Ms. Lakhani has undertaken short-term assignments or voluntary work for OHCHR, WomanKind, Development in Action, BOND-UK, European Youth Forum and Civicus. Ms. Lakhani has a PhD in Ethnicity and Social Exclusion, a Masters in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford, and a BSc in Social and Economic Geography from King's College, University of London.

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Salman M. A. Salman

Salman M. A. Salman is a consultant on water law and policy. Until December 2009, he worked as Lead Counsel and Water Law Adviser with the Legal Vice Presidency of the World Bank in Washington, D.C. Before joining the World Bank, he was a Legal Officer with the United Nations International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) in Rome, Italy. Prior to that, he was a lecturer at the Law School of the University of Khartoum in Sudan. Dr. Salman is the author or editor of ten books, and has published over forty articles and book chapters on water law. Some of his books have been translated to and published in Arabic, Chinese, French, and Russian. Dr. Salman obtained his LL.B. from the University of Khartoum Law School, and holds an LL.M. and a JSD from Yale Law School.

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Sam Huston

Sam Huston is a water sector expert and has over six years of experience on working on water and sanitation projects in Dominican Republic, Uganda, Afghanistan and Sudan. For more than 3 years Mr. Huston has worked in the water sector in Southern Sudan, first as the Program Coordinator for USAID and World Bank funded Pact Sudan's Water for Recovery and Peace Program (WRAPP) and then as the Water and Sanitation Advisor for USAID/Sudan. Additionally, Mr. Huston helped establish and served as the chair of the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Donor Group for Southern Sudan. He has an undergraduate degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Minnesota, USA and a Masters in Conflict Resolution from the University of Bradford, UK.

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Samir Elhawary

Samir Elhawary is a Research Officer at the Overseas Development Institute (ODI). He is currently researching the evolving role of humanitarian action in conflict-affected emergencies, with a particular focus on the interface between humanitarianism and politics. He also works on land and displacement issues and prior to joining the Humanitarian Policy Group at ODI, his work focused on the role of natural resources in armed conflict and was engaged in various initiatives to promote conflict sensitivity in the extractive industry.

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Sandra S. Nichols

Sandra S. Nichols is a senior attorney at the Environmental Law Institute where she focuses on protecting water resources and biodiversity, on climate adaptation, and on improving environmental governance in the U.S. and internationally. She also works on capacity-building programs for public officials, judges, and citizens. Ms. Nichols is also an adjunct professor at Troy University, where she teaches environmental ethics; environmental law; and environmental economics. As a staff attorney with WildLaw, in Montgomery, Alabama, she represented citizens’ groups on issues including national forests, water, endangered species, pollution, resource extraction, environmental justice, and land use. Nichols served as an Urban Environmental Management Volunteer in the Peace Corps in Côte d’Ivoire. She holds a bachelors degree in Earth and Environmental Science from Wesleyan University and a J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law.

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Sara Pantuliano

Sara Pantuliano is Programme Leader and Research Fellow at the Overseas Development Institute (ODI). She is a political scientist with extensive experience in programming in conflict and post-conflict contexts. Current research focuses on strengthening livelihoods security in protracted crises and post-conflict contexts (particularly around land tenure issues). Prior to joining the Humanitarian Policy Group at ODI she led UNDP Sudan's Peace Building Unit, brokered and managed a high-profile post-conflict response in the Nuba Mountains and was a resource person and an observer at the IGAD Sudan peace process. She holds a PhD in Politics and has lectured at the University of Dar es Salaam.

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Shubash Lohani

Shubash Lohani is currently Deputy Director for the Eastern Himalaya Ecoregion program at World Wildlife Fund (WWF-US). He has an extensive experience in large scale conservation planning, management, community development, climate change adaptation and natural resource governance. In his current role Shubash supports design, planning and implementation of large scale conservation and sustainable development projects in WWF's six priority landscapes in Nepal, Northeast India and Bhutan. Previously he was working with WWF Nepal where he gained experience on managing conservation project during and after the armed conflict. He played an instrumental role in developing the Terai Arc Landscape strategic and business plans for Nepal. He was also behind the designing and implementation of several innovative conservation approaches in Terai including carbon project for alternative energy. A Nepali citizen, Shubash holds a Masterls degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Tokyo.

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Simon J. A. Mason

Dr. Simon J A Mason, environmental scientist, mediator SDM, is Senior researcher in the “Mediation Support Project” at the Center for Security Studies, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich). Presently he supports the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs in its mediation and facilitation activities through tailor-made workshops, research and process support. His research areas include: mediation methodology, the link between environment, mediation and conflict prevention, and the link between religion and mediation. He has written about the Swiss mediation experiences in Sudan; Confidence building measures on the Korean Peninsula; water conflicts and cooperation in the Nile Basin, and UN conflict prevention related to the environment. He co-organized a series of dialogue workshops between Egyptians, Ethiopians and Sudanese on cooperation in the Eastern Nile Basin. He has contributed to training workshops on conflict, negotiation and mediation at Addis Ababa University, Egyptian Ministry of Water Resources, Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatc Studies (MEDAC, Malta), and the Peace Mediation Course of the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs.

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Siraj Sait

Siraj Sait is Reader and Head of Law Research at the University of East London (UK) where he co-ordinates the Human Rights and the Islamic and Middle East Studies programmes. A graduate of Harvard Law School and the Universities of Madras (India) and London, his expertise lies in human rights and development, gender and age responsive strategies, land and housing policies, Islamic law, refugee and post-conflict studies. A former State Prosecutor on Human Rights in India, he has also headed several grassroots campaigns. He has served as trustee of the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative and been consultant for Minority Rights Group International, UNHCR and UNICEF. He recently worked with UN-HABITAT supporting the launch of the Global Land Tool Network (GLTN) where he also pioneered the Mechanism on Gendering Land Tools and Islamic Strategies. He currently serves on the International Advisory Board of GLTN and is a member of the Centre on Human Rights in Conflict. His publications include Land, Law & Islam: Property and Human Rights in the Muslim World (Zed: 2006) (with H Lim) and the Policy Makers Guide to Women's Land, Property and Housing Rights (2006).

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Siri Aas Rustad

Siri Aas Rustad is a PhD student at the International Research Institute, Oslo. Her main research interests are the role of natural resource in conflicts and post-conflict situations. In her PhD dissertation the main objective is to investigate how different natural resource management's mechanisms work in given situations, and what pit-falls to avoid. She is particularly focusing on the role of oil in the Niger Delta, both as a contributor to the conflict; as well as different distribution schemes that could help solve the conflict. Her masters is from the Norwegian University of Technology and Science, is looking into the relationship between forest resources and conflict; this work has been published in Political Geography (2008).

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Sivapragasam Kugaprasatham

Sivapragasam Kugaprasatham has been with United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) as Project Officer for the Iraqi Marshlands Project from 2004 to 2009. Prior to joining with UNEP, he was employed at a water and environment consultancy firm in Japan for over thirteen years. His professional experience is in the areas of water supply, sanitation, environmental assessment and project management. He has worked in development projects in Sri Lanka, Thailand, Japan, Singapore, Vietnam, Nigeria, Kenya, Guatemala, Brazil, Cuba, Jamaica and Bosnia & Herzegovina. Kuga holds doctoral degree in urban engineering from the University of Tokyo, master degree in environmental engineering from the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT), Thailand and bachelor degree in civil engineering from the University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka.

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Sophie Ravier

Sophie Ravier is the Environmental Officer of the UN Department of Field Support (DFS) in New York. She is in charge of coordinating the environmental initiatives of UN Peacekeeping Operations and Special Political Missions. This includes giving technical and political advice on the implementation of the DPKO/DFS Environmental Policy for UN Field Missions, as well as doing outreach. She also worked for UNEP in its Liaison Office to the European Union (EU) in Brussels and participated in the UNFCCC negotiations on behalf of the UK Presidency of the EU. She holds a Master of International Relations from the University of Auvergne and a Master of Engineering from the 'Ecole des Mines d'Ales' in France, and a Certificate of Advanced Studies in Environmental Diplomacy of the University of Geneva. For more information, see http://www.un.org/en/peacekeeping/issues/environment/.

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Srey Chanthy

Srey Chanthy received a Bachelor's Degree from the Royal University of Agriculture in Cambodia in 1991 and a Master's Degree from the Asian Institute of Technology in Thailand in 1995. Srey served the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries between 1992 and 1997 in planning section of various departments, including the ex-Department of Planning, Statistics and International Cooperation. With MAFF he was involved in sector analysis, policy formulation, planning and programming as well as in negotiation of cooperation with bilateral and multilateral institutions. Srey deserted MAFF in the second quarter of 1997 when political tension was high and fighting broke out between the two major ruling parties — Cambodian People's Party and FUNCINPEC. He has been working as an independent development consultant for many donor agencies and non-governmental organizations, with a focus on agricultural and land sector reforms. He has been working as a consultant for Canadian Cooperation Office in Cambodia, a Project Support Unit of the Canadian International Development Agency, since 2004. Srey is a founding member of Cambodian Economic Association, Asian Institute of Technology Alumni Association of Cambodia, and Agri-Business Institute of Cambodia. He has extensive experience in agricultural, land and rural development policy training, analysis and planning over the past 15 years.

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Stephanie Altman

Stephanie Altman is an Envoy to the European Commission on Forestry Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade-Voluntary Partnership Agreements in Liberia and Ghana. Formerly, Stephanie worked as a Legal Advisor to the Minister of Agriculture in Liberia. Prior to living and working in Liberia, Stephanie was a Law Fellow at the Environmental Law Institute, where she worked as part of the Liberia Forest Initiative to inform the development of Liberia's new wildlife conservation law and model Forest Management Contract. Before her career as an attorney, Stephanie worked throughout West Africa for four years. She worked as a Field Team Leader for the Overseas Processing Entity where she assisted refugees seeking admission to the United States Refugee Resettlement Program. Stephanie was also an Agro-forestry Extension Agent for the Peace Corps in Senegal. Stephanie received a JD cum laude from Vermont Law School.

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Stephen Stec

Stephen Stec is Director of the Environmental Security Program of the Center for Environment and Security (CENSE) and Adjunct Professor at Central European University (Budapest), and a fellow of the Institute for East European Law and Russian Studies at Leiden University (Netherlands). Previously he was Head of the Environmental Law Programme at the Regional Environmental Center for Central and Eastern Europe (REC), where he directed projects supporting joint management of the Sava River Basin. In 2009 he was Visiting MESPOM Scholar in Residence at Middlebury College and the Monterey Institute of International Studies. His publications include ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES TO SECURITY (Springer: 2009) (co-edited with Besnik Baraj) and THE AARHUS CONVENTION: AN IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE (UN: 2000) (with Susan Casey-Lefkowitz). He is a member of the IUCN Commission on Environmental Law and ICEL, and serves on the editorial board of the European Energy and Environmental Law Review. In 2007 Mr. Stec was a co-recipient of the Rule of Law Award.

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Steve Lonergan

Dr. Steve Lonergan is a Professor in the Department of Geography, Univ. of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada. He holds a BSc from Duke University and an MA and PhD from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Lonergan began his academic career at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, and has held visiting posts at the University of Auckland (New Zealand), the University of Malaysia and Monash University (Australia). From 2003—2005, he was Director of the Division of Early Warning and Assessment (DEWA) at the United Nations Environment Programme in Nairobi, Kenya. Dr. Lonergan's research focuses on water resources in the Middle East, environmental change and population movement, and assessing the impacts of climate change and he is the author of two books and over 60 journal articles and reports. He presently leads a large project focusing on the restoration of the Iraqi Marshlands funded by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA).

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Suppiramaniam Nanthikesan

Suppiramaniam Nanthikesan worked over several years as Evaluation Adviser at the UNDP Evaluation Office where he managed a number of thematic evaluations, including the Evaluation of UNDP Assistance to Conflict-Affected Countries and the Tsunami Evaluation Coalition. A native of Sri Lanka, he was educated in Sri Lanka and the US and holds an MPA from Harvard University and a doctorate in Civil Engineering from MIT. He taught in Sri Lanka and worked in the private sector and the academia in the US for fifteen years prior to joining UNDP. He is currently Evaluation Adviser to the Regional Bureau for Africa in UNDP based in New York.

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T. Negbalee Warner

T. Negbalee Warner is the first and immediate past Head of the Secretarait of the Liberia Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (LEITI). He is credited as one of the key stakeholders that led Liberian to become EITI compliant in record time in October 2009. He led the LEITI Secretarait from October 2007-January 2010 and, in that capacity, helped develop and implement a comprehensive strategy to communicate the LEITI. Communicating the EITI deepened Negbalee's engagement with ordinary, poor, and vulnerable Liberians as it provided a unique opportunity to hear and respond to their disaapointments, expectations, and fears over the state of natural resource management in Liberia. The EITI experience has convinced Negbalee of the critical link between natural resources, poverty and conflict in Liberia, and probably other resource-rich countries. Negbalee is a lawyer by profession, and presently practices and teaches law in Liberia.

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Timothy Bosetti

Timothy Bosetti has a Master's Degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Texas, and is a licensed Professional Engineer with a concentration in environmental engineering and project management. He has provided engineering support and consultation to humanitarian missions and hurricane disaster relief. His field experience includes environmental engineering and base camp development support to North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Peacekeeping Operations in Bosnia, Macedonia, and Kosovo. Most recently he was a member of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Committee (SPSC) Workshop to develop environmental best management practices for peacekeeping and stability operations. He is a member of the American Water Works Association Water Re-Use Committee.

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Tina Sanio

Tina Sanio has a Master’s Degree in Social Anthropology and a Juridicum in International Law from the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich, Germany. Additional she has a degree as Peace and Conflict Consultant from the Academy for Conflict Transformation in the Civil Peace Forum, Bonn, Germany. Tina has research and field experience in Nepal (Maoist Revolution plus Local Peace Building through Community Forestry User Groups), Thailand (Conflict Management over Natural Resources) and Mongolia (Conflict over Land) and is currently working on different conflict transformation issues and planned interventions.

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Ulrike Joras

Ulrike Joras is a Senior Programme Officer at International Alert for the area of Economy and Peacebuilding. Prior to joining International Alert, she worked at the United Nations Headquarters in New York and for several NGOs and academic institutions, including the University of Munich, the Center for Development Research in Bonn, Germany, and swisspeace. Dr. Joras' main area of expertise is the role of private companies in violent conflicts and peacebuilding, as well as corporate social responsibility. She has conducted extensive field research, particularly in Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Guatemala, and has published on various aspects related to corporate engagement in peace. Dr. Joras holds a MA and a PhD, both from the University of Aachen, Germany.

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Vladislav Michalcik

Vladislav Michalcik received a law degree from the Faculty of Law at Masaryk University, Czech Republic in 2002. In 2003 - 2005, he worked in human rights advocacy and conflict resolution programs in non-governmental organizations in Washington DC, including the Institute for Multi-Track Diplomacy and Human Rights Watch, focusing on countries in Africa and South East Asia. At the Institute, he published an occasional paper on "People Power: Country Studies and Lessons Learned from National Non-violent Movements 2003-2005." Until 2007, Mr. Michalcik worked as a Legal/Kosovo Project Associate at the European Center for Minority Issues where he was involved in the implementation of capacity building and advisory projects in Kosovo. He also assisted ECMI's Director in research and publication projects focusing on self-determination issues and minority rights. Mr. Michalcik is currently pursuing an LL.M. degree in international legal studies at the Washington College of Law.

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Volker Boege

Volker Boege is a Research Fellow at the Australian Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies (ACPACS), University of Queensland, Australia. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Hamburg, and has considerable experience working on issues of natural resources, environmental degradation and violent conflict. In the 1990s he participated in the international research project ENCOP (Environment and Conflict Project) that was financed and coordinated by the Swiss Peace Foundation (Berne) and the ETH Zurich. From 2002 to 2005 he worked for the Bonn International Center for Conversion (BIIC) on issues of 'water, conflict and cooperation', with a regional focus on southern Africa. In late 2006 he has started work as the coordinator of the University of Queensland's consortium ConCord 'Community building and responsible resource development', based at ACPACS. He has done extensive research on violent conflicts and peacebuilding in the Pacific, including field work in Papua New Guinea/Bougainville, and published numerous books, articles and papers in the field of peace and conflict research.

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Will Rogers

Will Rogers is a research assistant with the Natural Security program at the Center for a New American Security. Prior to joining CNAS, Will was an intern with the Environmental Change and Security Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars where he frequently wrote on environmental security. Will has served as a research intern with the Hudson Institute, and is a former legislative intern with Senator Barbara Boxer. He has studied abroad at the University of Auckland, in Auckland, New Zealand, where he was a recipient of the 2007 Political Studies Senior Prize Scholarship. Will has a B.A in Political Science-International Relations from the University of California, San Diego where he focused on national security and foreign policy.

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Yacouba Savadogo

Yacouba Savadogo is the Environmental Law Legal Officer at the Ministry of Environment and Life in Burkina Faso, and is assigned the position of National Coordinator of the PADELIA project in Burkina (Partnership for the Development of Environmental Laws and Institutions in Africa). This project is funded by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). From 2004-2006, Yacouba taught environmental law at the National School of Environment, Waters and Forests of Burkina Faso. He has written several articles and papers on environmental law, sustainable development, and governance, and has also conducted studies in those fields. Formerly a legal intern of the Legal Office of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Mr. Savadogo is an independent expert accredited at the Executive Secretariat of the UNCCD (United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification). Mr. Savadogo is also the Coordinator of the Environmental Law Specialists Network of francophone Africa. Yavadogo has a master’s degree in Environmental Law from the University of Limoges (France) and a degree in International Environmental Law from the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR-Geneva). He is currently preparing a doctorate thesis in environmental law at the Institute of Environmental Law, Jean Moulin University Law School in Lyon (France).

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Yolanda Kakabadse

Yolanda Kakabadse is the Chair of the Advisory Board of Fundacion Futuro Latinoamericano, a regional NGO dedicated to conflict management in Latin America. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the Ford Foundation and the InterAmerican Dialogue; she is also a member of the Environmental Advisory Board of CocaCola and the Holcim Foundation. Ms. Kakabadse is the former Minister of Environment for Ecuador. She held office as President of IUCN — The World Conservation Union from 1996 to 2004. Ms. Kakabadse coordinated civil society participation in the Earth Summit (1992). She has received numerous honorary orders and awards, including the "Global 500 Award" of UNEP (1992), "Golden Ark Order" (1991) Zayed Prize (2001) and a Doctor in Science (ScD) Honoris Causa — from the University of East Anglia — 2008. Since January 1, 2010, Ms. Kakabadse has served as the President of WWF International.

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Yuka Toguchi

Yuka Toguchi is a graduate student of the Department of International Studies, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences at the University of Tokyo, Japan. Her research subjects include: flood control measures by local population and government, and the management of resource in post-conflict societies. She received her B.A.(2008) from the Nihon University (Department of Civil Engineering, College of Science and Technology). The title of her graduate thesis is, “Analysis of Environmental International Agreement: Comparison of Water and Sanitation with Climate Change.”

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Yuri Oki

Yuri Oki holds a M.A. in International Relations from the University of Tokyo. Conducted a Survey on peace-building in Mindanao, Philippines; Seeing Ethnologic Attributes as a Conflict Prevention Lens as her Master’s dissertation. Her general interest lies in the dynamics of post-conflict development, conflict prevention and peace-building. Land tenure and land resource management under the comprehensive scheme of peace-building is her current focus.

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